Author Topic: November 21, 1977 -- the Professor's return (and swan song!)  (Read 12110 times)

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Offline MSTieScott

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November 21, 1977 -- the Professor's return (and swan song!)
« on: December 28, 2013, 12:26:56 AM »
Nearly all of the episodes of "The Price Is Right" from 1972 onward have been preserved to this day (though a couple of early episodes are missing, and I think some of the master tapes may have been damaged a number of years ago). However, nothing in this world is free, and the company that keeps all of the show's tapes in climate-controlled storage charges for access (in order to cover their overhead).

And since "I'm just really curious" isn't enough justification to spend company money to access the tapes, there was no way for me to access the video of older episodes that I wanted to see. Still, after enough begging, I did get to see a copy of one episode that I know we've always had questions about -- 2571D.

Out of respect to my former employers and coworkers, I'm not going to put up any video. But this episode is important enough to the history of the show that I can't not share its contents, so hopefully an episode summary with screen grabs will be considered okay.

So with that, I give you...





The camera repeatedly zooms in and out on the "HOUR POWER" text while the technical director quickly taps the camera's feed on and off, with no effort to sync the motions together. Even by today's standards, this is quite a bit of sensory overload.

The first four contestants (all women, of course) come on down, Janice hands Bob his microphone, and we jump right into the first item up for bids:



A Pontiac Comfort-Mate recliner and swivel rocker. Holly pretends to be asleep, then snaps to attention as the panels reveal the prize.

Bob reminds the contestants that all of the prices have been rounded to the nearest dollar (it always throws me off when he says that instead of explaining that the goal is to bid closest to the price without going over) and the contestants put in their bids:

Julia -- 400
Barbara -- 375
Marcella -- 325
Susan -- 500

From start to finish, it took a total of 16 seconds for all four contestants to place their bids. Nowadays, it's a minor miracle if the contestants can place a bid within 16 seconds each.

The actual retail price is $588, and Susan follows Bob to the giant price tag, which has magically lowered at center stage following Bob's entrance through the doors. It wasn't uncommon for them to play giant price tag games in the first slot back in the 70s.

After a kiss, Bob invites a nervous Susan to look at all of the prizes she can win:



A Panasonic 19-inch color TV, an Amana side-by-side refrigerator/freezer, a Brother sewing machine, and Radio Shack stereo components. As was the custom at the time, before each individual prize is plugged, they cut to a shot of the contestant -- Susan is hanging on to Bob’s left arm for the entire duration of the copy.



As you all figured out when you saw the prizes, we're playing Danger Price. Is this what gave Jay Wolpert the inspiration to write his screenplay for "Pirates of the Caribbean" some 25 years later? No, of course not.

A quick explanation of the rules, and it's time to play. Not all of the audience is yelling suggestions, but of the ones that are, most are yelling "Two!", so Susan chooses number two and Janice reveals the price of the refrigerator.



I wonder if they realized that with such a tight shot, the chroma key effect is superfluous -- they could have used a split-screen and it would have essentially looked the same.

Now several of the audience members are yelling "Four!", so Susan chooses number four. I know they didn't worry about game conflicts so much back then, which is good, as this call-and-response is very similar to Most Expensive.



Then again, maybe the camera has just zoomed in too tight. I don't know what television safe zones were in 1977, but I'm pretty sure most home consoles would be cutting off that dollar sign on the far left.

Unfortunately, that was a loss. We see Janice start to reveal the price of the color TV, but Bob is already getting set to throw to commercial, so we cut back to Bob while Janice is at the halfway point of her reveal. My ability to rewind and pause tells me that the TV was $520; we never see the price of the sewing machine.

After a mere sixty seconds, the show is back and Johnny is calling down the next contestant. Here comes another video border and another item up for bids:



It's a Majestic freestanding fireplace. The models never kneel as the turntable is spinning around anymore.

Deborah -- 350
Julia -- 600
Barbara -- 610
Marcella -- 550

Four more quick bids, but the buzzer sounds, so the contestants need to bid again.

Deborah -- 320
Julia -- 295
Barbara -- 345
Marcella -- 310

The actual retail price is $330, and Deborah follows Bob, where once again the giant price tag is in place. As she arrives, she's crying a little bit. Bob consoles her -- she's made it onto the show, and she has a chance to win a big prize:



It's a 1978 Chevrolet Nova sedan. The camera slowly meanders into the door to take its close-up shot of the car -- Johnny has to read nine options before the plug is finished.

The giant price tag is still down as Bob tells Deborah that she's going to play a game that's only been played once before. And it begins with her meeting... Professor Price!



"Pomp and Circumstance" is played, and Bob explains how Professor Price will be keeping track of Deborah's correct and incorrect answers. Three correct answers wins the car. And now, it's time for everybody's favorite part of the "The Price Is Right": Bob Barker attempts to have a conversation with a puppet!

"Now Professor, you would like to see Deborah win, wouldn't you?"

Professor Price nods, and the audience laughs. Deborah laughs, too, which likely helps alleviate her nerves.

"She's a very sweet girl, and if—"

Professor Price nods again.

"Yes, Professor, she is -- a very sweet girl."

Bob decides to take a moment to talk to the actual human standing next to him, getting Deborah's assurance that if she wins the car, she won't cry.

"So you'll help all you can, won't you, Professor?"

Professor Price puts on his angry face and starts to shake his head "no." At which point the stagehand realizes that he's misinterpreted the question, so Professor Price's head makes an odd diagonal swivel to go to the nodding motion instead, with the facial expression changing mid-turn. So now Bob has to cover.

"No, he can't... he can't help you, you see. All he can do is keep score."

With that, Bob segues as quickly as he can to the game itself. He picks up a small stack of index cards and fans them toward Deborah.



I don't know how many cards there are, but for this playing of the game, the contestant will randomly choose which trivia questions are asked. Deborah takes a card from the center of the stack and, since nobody said otherwise, starts to turn it over.

"Don't look at it! Don't look at it -- the answer's on there."

Bob quickly takes the card back from Deborah before she can see anything, and asks the first question:

How many stars indicate the rank of a lieutenant general?

The audience was never admonished not to say anything, but they remain silent. After a couple of seconds, Deborah says, "Four."

Bob asks if four is the correct answer, and Professor Price shakes his head. Bob points out that one of the fingers on Professor Price's hand is pointing downward.



Yikes! Professor Price needs to see a dermatologist.

The correct answer is "three." So now it's time to get a correct answer by actually doing something related to prices. Bob asks to see the last two numbers in the four-digit price of the car.



Well... that may have been a tough question, but it's still a lucky draw. Because "three" was the correct answer to the question, Deborah must decide whether one of the first two numbers in the car's price is a 3. They've used some tricky car prices on this show in the past, but I don't think they'd be that mean.

Deborah predicts that there is no 3 in the first two positions, and Professor Price nods his head in agreement. One correct answer; one incorrect answer.

Since the 3 wasn't in the price of the car, nothing is revealed and Bob fans the index cards out toward Deborah again. Deborah chooses the top card and this time, doesn't turn it over. Her next question:

Washington's picture is on the one-dollar bill. On which dollar bill is the picture of Abraham Lincoln?

This is quite a departure in difficulty from the previous question! Without hesitation, Deborah says that Lincoln is on the five-dollar bill.

Bob asks if that's right, and Professor Price nods his head.



Looks like the ol' Professor is developing a little arthritis, though.

Deborah says that she works with money all day long -- she works for a food stamp outlet. So that question was easy for her. Of course, while it hasn't been stated outright, if you realize that all of these answers are single-digit numbers, there were only two possible answers to that question.

One more correct answer, and Deborah wins the car. Is 5 one of the first two numbers in the price of the car?

I don't know my 1970s prices all that well, but it seems to me like a Nova should go for four or five thousand dollars by this point. Deborah immediately says that there is a 5 in the price of the car. Is she right, Professor?



The Professor nods his head, and the set immediately starts to go berserk!



Cut to the price being revealed as $5,133! Cut to the owl flapping its wings! Cut to Deborah hugging Bob! Cut to the clock spinning its hands! Cut to the audience! Cut to Deborah! Cut to the owl again!

As Bob addresses the camera to throw to commercial, a nodding Professor Price once again briefly switches to his scowling face and "no" headshake before resuming his nodding.

"Yes, that Professor Price, I have a feeling, is going to become a very popular fellow!" Bob says. And that's the last we ever see of the game.
The statements and opinions expressed above are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the author's employer or any company the author has worked with, past or present. The next time you're at a checkout counter and you hear the beep...

Offline MSTieScott

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Re: November 21, 1977 -- the Professor's return (and swan song!)
« Reply #1 on: December 28, 2013, 12:28:09 AM »
So that was the reason we all wanted to see this episode. But there's still plenty more show to go -- let's see if anything else fun happens.

Another woman is called to come on down, and we move to our next item up for bids:



From Samsonite, it's four bar chairs "for your bedroom or den," along with a folding table with chairs. "Handsome enough, you won't want to fold them away."

Jo Ann -- 350
Julia -- 400
Barbara -- 425
Marcella -- 430

The actual retail price is $487, giving Marcella the win. She and her "Foxy Lady" t-shirt join Bob up by the turntable, where she has a chance to win a lamb coat with fox collar and cuffs from Zinman Furs worth $1,300.

Shell Game makes its appearance, and after some casual shell-shuffling, Bob asks for the first prize.



It's a West Bend coffee maker. I know the orange handle means decaf, but what does lemon yellow mean?

The wrong price is $40. Marcella says that the actual price is higher.

However, the price is $34, preventing Marcella from obtaining a chip.



From Sunbeam, it's Mr. Sharpy, a cordless electric pencil sharpener. This was back when companies would pay good money to advertise their pencil sharpeners on television. It comes in orange, yellow, or beige.

The wrong price is $20. Marcella says lower, and with an actual retail price of $15, she earns a chip. Marcella stands there holding the chip, and Bob prompts her to actually place it in front of one of the shells, as it won't win her anything otherwise. She chooses the second shell.



Next up is a skillet from Presto. I guess Presto couldn't be bothered to supply an accurate copy of their own logo, so CBS had to make an approximation using a TPIR daisy.

The skillet is not $34. Marcella says the correct answer is higher, and by a mere four dollars ($38), she's right. She chooses the fourth shell.



Finally, we have a McGraw Edison heater. It's not $45. Marcella goes with higher, is correct, and wins a $55 heater. Her last chip goes in front of the third shell.

Bob starts by revealing the fourth shell. And there's the ball -- Marcella is a winner! Bob quickly reveals the empty shells, then turns to the camera. And for a brief moment just stares ahead. It's unlike Bob to reveal the ball right off the bat like that (and I can tell you first-hand that it is possible to feel where the ball is as you mix the shells) -- I have a hunch that he wasn't expecting the ball to show up so quickly, and it threw him.

Still, he promptly gets his bearings back and throws to commercial.



Some members of our studio audiences will receive a twelve-cup drip coffee maker from Western Auto. You can never give away too many coffee makers on "The Price Is Right."



After another commercial pod, it's time for the Showcase Showdown. Bob tells the contestants about the $1,000 bonus for getting one dollar and reminds them that the wheel has to go all the way around at least once. An explanation of how the object is to be the closest to one dollar without going over, identifying the order in which the contestants spin, and then it's time for Susan to spin the wheel.

As she did in Danger Price, Susan latches onto Bob's arm as the wheel is spinning, making for a cramped shot in a tiny triangle. With a first spin of 80 cents, she chooses to stay. Bob walks her over to the scoreboard.

Marcella's first spin is worth 70 cents. She spins again, and 30 is making its way down...



But that's as close as it gets. Marcella is over.

Deborah is still acting a little timid, so Bob gives her a pep talk about how contestants who win often go on a winning streak. Deborah spins the wheel, gets 35 cents, then spins again and lands on 25 cents. Which means that Susan is on her way to the Showcase.



Here's Johnny to call another contestant. That's all of Johnny's checkered jacket they could safely show without overloading the fragile cathode ray tubes of televisions in the 1970s.

A woman named Louise excitedly comes on down, so Bob has a brief conversation with her.

"Hey Louise, you look to me like a lady who is ready to win some prizes."

"I am, I am, I am, I am."

"Have you been watching our show at home?"

"Oh, every day, every day, every day."

"Every day, every day, every day?"

"Every day."

"Yes. And when you're at home, do you play the games along with the contestants?"

"Oh, sure do, sure do."

"Sure do. When you're at home, playing the games along with the contestants onstage, do you win?"

(pause) "Yeah."

After establishing that Louise is ready to win, we see the next item up for bids:



From Wavecrest, it's a waterbed mattress, and from Mo-Zar Industries, it's a solid wood frame and nightstands.

Louise -- 495
Jo Ann -- 450
Julia -- 700
Barbara -- 650

The actual retail price is $625, and Louise chases Bob over to the big doors. Bob asks her to be gentle, so she gingerly gives him a kiss. And now she has a chance to win these two prizes:



An entertainment center from Waterhouse, Inc. and a pool table from Murrey. The "Family Feud" theme plays -- its use as a TPIR prize cue never ceases to disorient me.

Janice walks out with a price of $1095. Louise decides that it belongs with the pool table.

Do we have our third winner of the day?



We do! Louise wins a $1,095 pool table and a $1,550 entertainment center.

Time for a quick moment with the models. Bob is thinking of a number between 1 and 10. Whichever model guesses it gets to make the upcoming announcement. Dian chooses 4, Holly picks 8, and Janice goes with 3. Bob says the number was 4, so Dian gets to deliver the announcement: "There's more 'Price Is Right' coming up."

Johnny delivers his usual "There's more pricing games..." mid-show bumper, and then it's time for the affiliates to run some commercials.
The statements and opinions expressed above are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the author's employer or any company the author has worked with, past or present. The next time you're at a checkout counter and you hear the beep...

Offline MSTieScott

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Re: November 21, 1977 -- the Professor's return (and swan song!)
« Reply #2 on: December 28, 2013, 12:29:59 AM »
We're back, and it's time for Leslie to come on down! And... oh my...



"Hello, Leslie!" Bob says, suddenly more alert.

Some hoots and howls from the audience.

Leslie tells Bob, "I didn't have anywhere else to put it!"

"You had no place else to put your name tag? No..."

Johnny laughs.

Bob says, "I can think of a couple of places to put it, Leslie."

Laughter and applause.

"I've got to tell you Leslie, I don't know what it is, but something about you has brought a whole new excitement to this show." (pause for laughter) "And I'm in just the place to enjoy it up here." (another pause) "But we can't go on this way, we'll be raided for doing burlesque without a license, you know that?"

(Incidentally -- I showed this screen grab to Program Practices, and no, a contestant wouldn't be able to get away with wearing that on the show nowadays.)

Here's the conservatively-dressed Holly with the next item up for bids:



A clock inside an oak ship's wheel accented with brass fittings. Well, why not?

Leslie -- 200
Jo Ann -- 350
Julia -- 410
Barbara -- 325

The actual retail price is $349. Jo Ann initially thinks that she's the winner, but Bob has to explain why Barbara gets to come up onto the stage.

So it's Barbara who has a chance to win this:



The Buick Regal. A different part of the "Family Feud" theme plays for this plug. And this time, Johnny has to list eleven options before the plug is over.

Bob is at the Three Strikes board, and places the following numbers into the bag: 7, 1, 6, and 0. Along, of course, with three strikes.

A quick explanation of the rules, and Barbara reaches into the bag. Her first pull... is a strike.

Barbara reaches into the bag again. A couple of people in the audience yell "Number!" And this time, she pulls out the 1. Barbara says that's the second number in the price of the car. The camera quickly zooms in, then the buzzer sounds. There's no "NO" effect at this point in the history of the game.

Barbara pulls the 1 again, and this time tries it in the third position. And she's right!

Barbara's next draw is the 7. She immediately says it's the first number, but she's wrong. Back in the bag.

And Barbara pulls out... another strike.

Barbara needs to avoid that last strike to stay in the game. Her next draw... is the third strike. Game over. The price of the car was $6,017.

From the time Barbara came up on stage to Bob's throw to commercial, that took all of three minutes to accomplish. Three Strikes moved much more quickly back then.

After the commercial break, the ninth and final woman is called to come on down for today's episode. Let's go back to the turntable for the next item up for bids:



From Hardwick, we have a new range. It's available in four colors -- sadly, the copy doesn't mention what the other three colors are.

Florette -- 480
Leslie -- 351
Jo Ann -- 550
Julia -- 300

The actual retail price is $470. Julia remains in Contestants' Row for the entire show. And look alive censors, because Leslie is running up the stairs!

Bob is waiting at the top of the stairs and Leslie attacks him with a forceful hug around his neck, shaking him about. After Bob regains his bearings and learns a little bit more about Leslie (she's a part-time student), he offers her a 14-foot West Wight Potter sailboat worth $2,970.

The pricing game is Hurdles. I always forget that this pricing game was played more times than I think it was, so I'm always pleasantly surprised when I see it. Leslie says she knows how to play the game, so let's take a look at the hurdler. Today he's worth 79˘ and is represented by a jar of Sue Bee honey.



At the first hurdle, we have Bonbel cheese and Canada Dry tonic water. Even though the prices are 36 years old, it's still easy to play along with this game when you realize that it's simply a matter of choosing the less expensive item. Leslie chooses the tonic water and Bob places the flag.



Here was have Nestlé Souptime 10-second soup mix and Goya paella mix (just add rice). Leslie is unsure what that second product is, so she has to bend down to take a closer look -- a very risky thing to do in that dress. She returns without incident and chooses the soup mix.



Finally, ChapStick lip balm and Mr. and Mrs. "T" cocktail mix. Without hesitation, Leslie chooses the ChapStick.

After Bob places the final flag, he reaches for the starter's pistol, and the race is on!

"Race" being a relative term, of course. The hurdler slowly approaches the hurdle for the tonic water. At 39˘, he easily clears it.

The hurdle for the soup mix begins to rise. And rises and rises... 61˘!

It's all down to the ChapStick. The hurdler approaches. The cameras zoom in. And the ChapStick is... 69˘! Leslie wins the sailboat!

Which means that it's time for Leslie to give Bob another forceful hug lasting a solid twelve seconds. As he throws to commercial, Bob speculates on what might happen if Leslie wins $1,000 on the wheel.

After the commercials, we return for the second Showcase Showdown. Barbara is first at the wheel and lands on 50 cents. Bob goes into detail explaining the risks of both spinning again and staying with that number. The decision doesn't seem to be too difficult for Barbara, who chooses to stay.

Louise steps up to the wheel and spins a 55. Bob goes into equally as much detail explaining Louise's options. As he does so, Barbara leaves. Louise stays at 55.

It's Leslie's turn to spin the wheel, and she also lands on 55 cents. After Bob presents her with her choices, Leslie chooses to have a spin-off.

So it's back to the wheel for Louise. Bob reminds us that getting a dollar is still worth $1,000. But Louise's spin zips right by that space, landing on 75 cents.

Leslie takes her spin-off spin. As the wheel slows down toward the border between 10 and 45, Bob dismisses Leslie. The camera cuts away before the wheel comes to a complete stop -- since the wheel didn't beep, I'm going to guess that Leslie got a dime. Either way, Louise is going to the showcase.

Commercials. Contestants not appearing on stage receive:



Lloyd's home video game with six different sports (they're counting one-player squash and two-player squash as separate sports, as well as two different types of shooting games), an assortment of Daisy Legs pantyhose, and an assortment of Metzler International his and her sunglasses. None of these companies still exist in the United States today.
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Offline MSTieScott

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Re: November 21, 1977 -- the Professor's return (and swan song!)
« Reply #3 on: December 28, 2013, 12:33:37 AM »
More commercials, then it's time for the Showcase round. Louise is the top winner; Susan is runner-up. Bob explains the rules, including that if the winner is less than $100 from the retail price of her showcase, she'll win both showcases.

And here's the first showcase!



"Splendido!" plays us into a new living room from Broyhill. "And to add color to any room," 60 square yards of carpeting from Barwick Corp. The canned applause approves.

Mounted to the wall behind the loveseat, there's a new cleaning system.



Hey, look at that! That's a pretty clever way to get both contestants in the same reaction shot. Rich, we need to travel back in time four years and try that.



Back to the showcase, it's Wal-Vac's central vacuum cleaning system. "Installs as easily as a medicine chest. Perfect for mobile homes, apartments, and houses." I would have gotten into a lot of trouble if I tried to install that thing in my apartment.



Finally, over in door 3, we have a pair of Benelli Phantom 250cc motorcycles. You shouldn't use them at the same time you're using your new living room.

This showcase can be yours if the price is right. But whose? Louise immediately passes the showcase to Susan. Susan takes a moment to think, then puts in a bid of $3,500. Susan looks a little less nervous than she did at the beginning of the show. Though she also may be holding onto that podium for dear life, I'm not sure.

It's time to see Louise's showcase!



And here we have a recurring showcase of that time: "That Great Entertainer." Today we'll be looking at the career of Tyrone Power. I trust that this selection made more sense back in 1977, as I have absolutely no idea who this man is.



The chroma key blue doors close, and we see Mr. Power in "The Mark of Zorro." See how heroic he looks, as he glances nervously over his shoulder.

"And if you've always dreamed of crossing swords like Tyrone Power," you'll have your chance with these new fencing outfits.



Two fencing outfits with foils from the Joseph Vince Company. And do you see that plaque on the wall? That represents six half-hour introductory fencing lessons from an accredited fencing instructor.

Surprise! That figure on the right is actually Holly, who was standing motionless for those last two plugs!



Here's another black-and-white publicity photo that the show was able to inexpensively license, from "Captain from Castille." Johnny says that it was one of Tyrone Power's most famous roles... I guess I'm just not that up-to-date on my 1940s cinema. At any rate, the movie was partially set in the country that is the next prize... Spain!



A trip for two, roundtrip air coach from Los Angeles to Madrid, Spain for a one-week stay at Hotel Meliá Castilla. It offers 1,000 luxury rooms, though I suspect you'll only get to stay in one of them.



Now, I know what you're thinking: "But what about Tyrone Power's role as Larry Darrell in 'The Razor's Edge'"? Don't worry, that's what we're covering next. As I'm sure you already know, in that movie, Power's character travels to... India!



From Spain, the travelers will continue to New Delhi, India (a cost-saving measure the show almost always employed for multi-trip showcases) for a six-night stay in a luxurious hotel. Since there's no promoted hotel, Johnny goes into travelogue mode, talking about the many interesting things you can do in New Delhi as the camera tilts up across a couple of all-purpose pictures of India.



"In one of Tyrone Power's later roles, he played an actual person: pianist Eddy Duchin." The movie was the appropriately-named "The Eddy Duchin Story," and it should come as no surprise that the final prize in this showcase is a baby grand piano.



Door 3 opens up again, only instead of a pair of motorcycles, it now contains a Cable walnut baby grand piano. That seems impressive, but I went back and checked -- there was an edit between the showcases. Incidentally, those plexiglass flower pillars are the same ones that flanked the fur coat back in act three.

The chroma key doors open back up, and that's the end of the showcase. They didn't always have a vehicle hiding behind that "Great Entertainer" wall.

Louise bids $4,900 on that showcase. And just like in the nighttime version, we go directly to the results. We immediately learn that the actual retail price of Louise's showcase is $9,092. Which means that Louise is off by a mere $4,192.

Susan is nervously tapping the podium as Bob explains that she must be closer than $4,192 without going over. Susan bid $3,500 on her showcase. The actual retail price is...

$5,654, which means that Susan is the winner!

Add in the chairs that Susan won at the beginning of the show, and she receives $6,242 worth of prizes. If anything, she somehow looks more nervous now that she's given Bob a hug and is about to walk over to her prizes.

Susan briefly sits in her new living room and is then led over to her motorcycles, which have been moved over to door 2, with the "Great Entertainer" wall rolled away.



The full credits roll by as Susan sits on one of her motorcycles. I've worked with exactly five of these people.

"Stay tuned for 'Match Game' starring Gene Rayburn, next over most of these CBS stations."



Good-bye!
« Last Edit: December 28, 2013, 01:44:31 AM by Seth »
The statements and opinions expressed above are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the author's employer or any company the author has worked with, past or present. The next time you're at a checkout counter and you hear the beep...

Offline goldroadfanatic

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Re: November 21, 1977 -- the Professor's return (and swan song!)
« Reply #4 on: December 28, 2013, 12:44:43 AM »
It's really strange to see Johnny in a calldown window, which would become the preserve of Rod, Rich, and George.  I wonder how the transition went.

Thanks for taking the time to do a play-by-play recap of the show, Scott.  It's interesting that Bob let the contestant pick the questions in Professor Price, I wonder why that was introduced after the previous playing resulted in a win.
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Offline vadernader

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Re: November 21, 1977 -- the Professor's return (and swan song!)
« Reply #5 on: December 28, 2013, 01:02:50 AM »
Wow thanks so much for this Scott, this is great. The Price is Right Decades game crew actually got their hands on this episode as well - as mentioned here:

We actually have been able to see the second playing of Professor Price, but it was also a perfect win, iirc. We just came up with the most logical rules we could for those situations :)
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Offline TheGRVOfLightning

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Re: November 21, 1977 -- the Professor's return (and swan song!)
« Reply #6 on: December 28, 2013, 01:17:09 AM »
Thank you Scott! Oh and thanks for putting this in the right board.
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Offline blozier2006

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Re: November 21, 1977 -- the Professor's return (and swan song!)
« Reply #7 on: December 28, 2013, 03:01:08 AM »
(Incidentally -- I showed this screen grab to Program Practices, and no, a contestant wouldn't be able to get away with wearing that on the show nowadays.)
If a woman showed up at Studio 33 in similar attire today, would she be simply be told to put another shirt or a jacket on, or would she be turned away from the studio altogether (presumably with instructions to wear something more conservative if she wanted to be admitted next time)?

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Re: November 21, 1977 -- the Professor's return (and swan song!)
« Reply #8 on: December 28, 2013, 03:39:00 AM »
Amazing stuff, Scott. Thanks so much!

Offline GuyWithFace

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Re: November 21, 1977 -- the Professor's return (and swan song!)
« Reply #9 on: December 28, 2013, 04:00:08 AM »
Many thanks for doing this, Scott -- perhaps more classic-episode recappers should go this route...?

(Lineup in a nutshell: Danger Price, Professor Price, Shell Game, One Right Price, 3 Strikes, Hurdles.)

By this point, the show is giving away three consolation prizes, which narrows down that change.

And Leslie? From the description, Bob came across as a bit creepy...especially so given that he was still married at this point.

Marcella [...] has a chance to win a lamb coat with fox collar and cuffs from Zinman Furs worth $1,300.
...Which in turn would explain why GSN only ever aired the first playing of Professor Price.

There's no "NO" effect at this point in the history of [3 Strikes].
Not entirely surprising; there was no graphic until Season 14 (post-Johnny) or its first playing of Season 15.

The Price is Right Decades game crew actually got their hands on this episode as well - as mentioned here:

We actually have been able to see the second playing of Professor Price, but it was also a perfect win, iirc. We just came up with the most logical rules we could for those situations :)
I am skeptical, since the rule for "if the answer to the first or third question is not in the price of the car" was clearly displayed in this second playing. Then again, I do not recall how the Ludia game handled that situation.
« Last Edit: December 28, 2013, 04:02:26 AM by GuyWithFace »
The above is my opinion and mine alone.

To answer your questions: yes, I am a guy and yes, I have a face. (I also have the occasional spurt of weirdness.)

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People are tired of the f**kery and drama, but if we'd actually talk to each other sometimes instead of a whole bunch of private conversations with other people, it'd go a long way to perhaps fixing the problems most seem to see in the site.

Offline MSTieScott

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Re: November 21, 1977 -- the Professor's return (and swan song!)
« Reply #10 on: December 28, 2013, 12:56:17 PM »
If a woman showed up at Studio 33 in similar attire today, would she be simply be told to put another shirt or a jacket on, or would she be turned away from the studio altogether (presumably with instructions to wear something more conservative if she wanted to be admitted next time)?

They'd simply tell her to put a shirt or jacket on.


I am skeptical, since the rule for "if the answer to the first or third question is not in the price of the car" was clearly displayed in this second playing. Then again, I do not recall how the Ludia game handled that situation.

According to this YouTube clip, TPIR Decades got it wrong -- even when the answer to the trivia question wasn't in the price of the car, the game revealed a number anyway.

Which makes me curious: Since the two questions in that clip are taken directly from the first playing of Professor Price, I wonder whether the game includes the lieutenant general or five-dollar bill question.
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Offline Priceboi1983

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Re: November 21, 1977 -- the Professor's return (and swan song!)
« Reply #11 on: December 28, 2013, 03:42:34 PM »
MSTieScott Thank you for this. I enjoy the early days of TPIR as much as the current days. While Professor Price may have had some issues, I think the game could have lasted longer. I wonder how the game would work today if it were to be revamped? Thoughts? I also think Super Ball and Penny Ante could have been redone.
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Offline goldroadfanatic

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Re: November 21, 1977 -- the Professor's return (and swan song!)
« Reply #12 on: December 28, 2013, 04:10:05 PM »
Which makes me curious: Since the two questions in that clip are taken directly from the first playing of Professor Price, I wonder whether the game includes the lieutenant general or five-dollar bill question.

It doesn't; I believe some of the other questions are: "How many syllables are in 'The Price is Right' (answer: 4)?" and "Uranus is what number planet from the Sun? (answer: 7)?"
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Offline Nick

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Re: November 21, 1977 -- the Professor's return (and swan song!)
« Reply #13 on: December 28, 2013, 09:48:48 PM »
Scott, thank you so much for this!  Thanks for being so detailed as well.  This recap is so well-written I can visualize the episode playing in my head.

The camera repeatedly zooms in and out on the "HOUR POWER" text while the technical director quickly taps the camera's feed on and off, with no effort to sync the motions together. Even by today's standards, this is quite a bit of sensory overload.

Cut to the price being revealed as $5,133! Cut to the owl flapping its wings! Cut to Deborah hugging Bob! Cut to the clock spinning its hands! Cut to the audience! Cut to Deborah! Cut to the owl again!

And this, ladies and gentlemen, is why Marc Breslow was the greatest director The Price Is Right ever had.
Roger Dobkowitz's Seven Commandments of The Price Is Right:
1. Tape and edit the show as if it were live.
2. Never tell the contestant what to do.
3. Size matters. (The bigger the prize, the better the prize and the bigger the reaction.)
4. All prizes are good.
5. Never do anything on the show that would embarrass a parent with a kid watching.
6. Never put on a prize that would make the show look cheap.
7. It’s the game, stupid! (It’s about the game.)

- Roger Dobkowitz on Stu's Show September 23, 2009.

Offline GuyWithFace

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Re: November 21, 1977 -- the Professor's return (and swan song!)
« Reply #14 on: December 29, 2013, 12:51:30 AM »
It doesn't; I believe some of the other questions are: "How many syllables are in 'The Price is Right' (answer: 4)?" and "Uranus is what number planet from the Sun? (answer: 7)?"
...Which in turn suggests that whoever was responsible for making Professor Price for the Ludia game had never actually seen the second playing, as neither the questions from that playing nor the correct "second or fourth answer is no" rule are actually present.
« Last Edit: December 29, 2013, 12:53:56 AM by GuyWithFace »
The above is my opinion and mine alone.

To answer your questions: yes, I am a guy and yes, I have a face. (I also have the occasional spurt of weirdness.)

Quote from: thepriceis_J
People are tired of the f**kery and drama, but if we'd actually talk to each other sometimes instead of a whole bunch of private conversations with other people, it'd go a long way to perhaps fixing the problems most seem to see in the site.