Author Topic: Pricing game changes that improved those games?  (Read 2006 times)

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Offline gamesurf

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Re: Pricing game changes that improved those games?
« Reply #30 on: May 08, 2018, 04:04:13 PM »
Yeah, that's exhibit #2 of "It's not what you give away, it's how you do it". The Shell Game bonus overshadows the actual prize, and it often means that a nearly perfect game ends on a low note.

Offline rowlande

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Re: Pricing game changes that improved those games?
« Reply #31 on: May 08, 2018, 06:27:02 PM »
I have to say buy or sell with the cash bonus

Offline dmaingame

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Re: Pricing game changes that improved those games?
« Reply #32 on: May 15, 2018, 10:57:13 PM »
Noticed responses-- thanks! One other that, IMO, made one better is Hole in One, or Two. Before, you only had one shot at the putt, and if you muffed it in any way, you were out of luck. The way it is now (which, IINM, began in '86), you have two chances at your putt (which helps with difficult putts where you don't move but one or two steps in the setup phase [arrangement of grocery prices from lowest to highest]); there is, also, that neat change where Bob/Drew presses the button on the title sign to change the title whenever the second chance is needed.

Remember how initially before the set had the spinning golf ball that indicated "Hole In One or Two" they had an "or two" stake that was added to the side of the original Hole In One sign??  I agree that adding the second putt was a great way to make Hole In One better as not all contestants are avid golfers and putting under the lights and in front of a studio audience could even make a good golfer miss a putt. 

Offline PIRfanSince72

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Re: Pricing game changes that improved those games?
« Reply #33 on: May 16, 2018, 04:40:47 PM »
Gas Money - Eliminating the wrong prices and trying to leave the right one for last rather than picking the right one at the beginning of the game.

Pocket Change - Giving the first digit of the car for free, and starting the player off with 25 cents pocket change rather than having to guess all 5 digits in the car and having nothing in pocket change to begin.  (On a side note, since the contestant eventually ends up picking 4 envelopes off of the board, as a time saver I'd like to see the contestant just pick all 4 off right away to start the game.)

Half Off - Giving a $1,000 bonus for getting all 3 half off items correct.

Time Is Money - The revamped game, while more exciting than the original concept, still makes it very difficult for audience members (both at home and in the studio) to play along with.

Pass The Buck - Going from 8 numbers with 3 "Lose Everything" cards down to 6 numbers and only 2 "Lose Everything" cards, as well as only having to pass the buck twice instead of 3 times during the game, and in doing so earning 1 free pick.

Make Your Move - When they reverted back to the 2-3-4 formula rather than the overlapping digit they did for a brief time.

Hole In One - Adding the second putt although I would amend the rule whereby if a player goofed right away on the pricing portion, and had to putt from the line farthest away from the hole, they only get one chance.  To me, they should have to get at least one pricing decision right to earn a second putt.

Dice Game - Going from cars using any digits to digits only appearing on the dice.

Cliff Hangers - For a very brief time when the game began, if I recall correctly, there were 4 small prizes to guess instead of 3.  Cutting it down to 3 was much better.

Ten Chances - The unspoken rule of all prices ending in zero.

Lucky Seven - The unspoken rule of no zeroes appearing in the price, although I know they did in the earlier years.

Hi Lo - Having to pick the 3 highest priced products is better than the original version where a player saw the price and had to place it in the Hi or Lo row, and the game continued that way until it was evident that they lost.

Range Game - Increasing the original range from $50 to $150!

Grocery Game - Ditching the $100 bonus if a player quit the game or used up all 5 products before reaching the $6.75 minimum amount required to win.


Offline Alfonzo

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Re: Pricing game changes that improved those games?
« Reply #34 on: May 16, 2018, 04:46:14 PM »
Shell Game - Making the value of the prize a cash bonus if the contestant gets all 4 shells instead of just $500.

There is such thing as "Too much awesome." The main prize should never be outshined by a supplementary bonus. That just makes for bad television if the contestant loses. Plus, it will be absolutely ludicrous if Shell Game gets played for a $20,000 car, the contestant gets all four prizes and loses a $20,000 bonus. Awkward much?
"Audience, if you're scared buy a dog!"

Bryan, the Punchboard player who gave up $5,000 for a chance at $10,000 and won ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FPQ_RRwCfhY )

Offline Superballer

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Re: Pricing game changes that improved those games?
« Reply #35 on: May 16, 2018, 07:39:33 PM »
Ten Chances - The unspoken rule of all prices ending in zero.

Lucky Seven - The unspoken rule of no zeroes appearing in the price, although I know they did in the earlier years.


Similarly, having Safe Crackers operate in this manner as well can be considered an improvement than simply taking educated guesses for all 3 numbers. 

Offline pannoni1

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Re: Pricing game changes that improved those games?
« Reply #36 on: May 17, 2018, 07:21:24 AM »
Including three retired or revamped games, these all had their rules change early in their life.

Bullseye: Allowing any item that hit the target to allow for the Hidden Bullseye to give the contestant a win
Hot Seat (presumably): Allowing the contestant to see which item would be revealed next before deciding to bail.
It's Optional: Allowing a contestant to pick one option at a time
Time Is Money (2003): Eliminating the $500 voucher, adding five seconds to each run, and knowing how many products you have right after the first guess. Not much better, but by 2003, $500 was hardly a tempting amount to bail on.
Walk of Fame: Reducing the number of autograph books that could give you a second chance from three to two and increasing the range on the first prize.

Now open for tape trading! Please PM me for an offer with a list included.

The list: http://pannoni1.angelfire.com/

Offline jimme

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Re: Pricing game changes that improved those games?
« Reply #37 on: Yesterday at 08:17:00 AM »
1.) I remember when Bob said, "Now we're not going to use the clock today.  Instead you will get three chances..." in explaining Split Decision.  I thought this was good because we won't see some dolt looking out the audience as the clock keeps ticking down.
2.) Punch-A-Bunch was made better by the simplified way they play now - your money prize is in the slot.  In the original format, you selected a letter from "PUNCHBOARD" which was hundred or thousand, then multiplied it by a number below in one of the holes.