Author Topic: Your TPIR wishes for 2019  (Read 7656 times)

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Offline ThomHuge

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Re: Your TPIR wishes for 2019
« Reply #75 on: February 18, 2019, 08:31:27 PM »
But the daytime TV landscape could look radically different if that happens--and Price's value to the network could change as the daytime landscape changes. It's certainly not a sure thing.

It's kind of a catch-22 when you think about it (or at least that's how I see it). We all know daytime TV ratings are steadily falling and have been for ages. I think a major driver of that is the overload of advertising, but that's an unsubstantiated belief. Regardless, falling ratings mean they have to squeeze in more ads, to maximize return on investment for everyone who IS watching...which turns into a vicious cycle. (Ad overload is precisely why I rely on Amazon Unbox for just about all my TV needs...no commercials.)

I strongly believe that reducing the amount of ads per show would get people to start tuning back in. Not only is it less disruptive, fewer commercials should in theory result in better ones.

Yes, I know...long shot, but I'd like to think the logic is sound at least.

Offline JayC

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Re: Your TPIR wishes for 2019
« Reply #76 on: February 18, 2019, 10:58:21 PM »
First of all, it is regularly played for big ticket cars in the $40-$50-$60k range and does not get played too often nowadays. This way, if they can play it for less expensive cars, it would get more playing time again.
The luxury cars are the big draw for 3 Strikes and what makes it worth the time it takes to play. They tried to play it for just regular cars in season 37 and it went away for a long time and went back to being played for luxury cars again.





Offline EvilChameleon

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Re: Your TPIR wishes for 2019
« Reply #77 on: February 18, 2019, 11:28:56 PM »
First of all, it is regularly played for big ticket cars in the $40-$50-$60k range and does not get played too often nowadays. This way, if they can play it for less expensive cars, it would get more playing time again.

So you don't care if it's won or not, you just want it to have more playtime? If they wanted to play a hard car game for a cheap car, they would just play Stack The Deck.

Offline pannoni1

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Re: Your TPIR wishes for 2019
« Reply #78 on: February 19, 2019, 08:00:07 AM »
It's kind of a catch-22 when you think about it (or at least that's how I see it). We all know daytime TV ratings are steadily falling and have been for ages. I think a major driver of that is the overload of advertising, but that's an unsubstantiated belief. Regardless, falling ratings mean they have to squeeze in more ads, to maximize return on investment for everyone who IS watching...which turns into a vicious cycle. (Ad overload is precisely why I rely on Amazon Unbox for just about all my TV needs...no commercials.)

I strongly believe that reducing the amount of ads per show would get people to start tuning back in. Not only is it less disruptive, fewer commercials should in theory result in better ones.

Yes, I know...long shot, but I'd like to think the logic is sound at least.

It's not just the overload of ads, it's the TYPE of ads that play through! As you know, 60-second (and even some 90 and 120 second) prescription pharmaceutical spots (AKA the "Ask your doctor") ads are some of the most commonly seen on TV these days, as opposed to the 15- and 30-second over-the-counter ones that were common for the show's first 25 years or so. You also have more stuff like insurance companies and money lending that only sells with a much narrower-focused audience. You don't see as many ads for things like food, house cleaning products, department stores, or even things like batteries like you traditionally saw, and so many of the "good" ones are just 15 seconds long, often sandwiched in between the long pharma/insurance ones. So the Selsun Blues, Lysols, Actifeds, Kellogg's, and Duracells have taken a back seat to the Xeraltos, Liberty Mutuals, AstraZenecas, and more that appeal to the teleworkers as opposed to the stay-at-home moms. You'll see that difference if you watch the original broadcasts with commercials that circulate from most of the Bob era compared to those from the Drew era.
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Offline PIRfanSince72

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Re: Your TPIR wishes for 2019
« Reply #79 on: March 10, 2019, 01:58:21 PM »
To me, if the show is in "budget" mode so often, I'd rather they use the Johnny Carson Tonight Show model.

Just air 3 original episodes per week and have Monday and Friday episodes be "best of" episodes instead.

I'd rather see 3 episodes that are somewhat more exciting than 5 semi-exciting eps.

That being said, I wish the show could have twice as many good pricing games.

Often I have complained how whenever a car is driven out on stage, we know it's Lucky Seven that will be played.  Come up with a second pricing game with that same set up so people will say "Oh it's NOT Lucky Seven this time!"  That's the one beautiful thing about Split Decision, as that game had a very similar intro as Any Number.  But to the trained fan, if Rod said "or a new car!" you knew it was Any Number but if he said "AND a new car!" it was Split Decision....

Offline b_masters8

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Re: Your TPIR wishes for 2019
« Reply #80 on: March 12, 2019, 02:29:17 PM »
I'd rather see 3 episodes that are somewhat more exciting than 5 semi-exciting eps.

Personally, I feel that even a semi-exciting episode with one or two wins (even if they're not car wins) is far better than a dud with no wins whatsoever.