Author Topic: Washington Post article re: TPIR  (Read 3878 times)

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Offline strongbad

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Washington Post article re: TPIR
« on: January 13, 2019, 01:44:13 PM »
Hey folks, it’s been a while since I posted anything but thought I’d share this Washington Post article about the show.  Enjoy 😀

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/style/wp/2019/01/11/feature/how-the-price-is-right-endures-as-tvs-oldest-most-beloved-daytime-game-show/?utm_term=.c0cc2a60c341

Offline JayC

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Re: Washington Post article re: TPIR
« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2019, 04:26:53 PM »
Very good article, one of the best about the show I remember reading.

Offline thatvhstapeguy

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Re: Washington Post article re: TPIR
« Reply #2 on: January 13, 2019, 08:04:01 PM »
Actually... a decent article! I know I'm playing into the fan stereotype here, but the first thing I noticed is that they did get the Showcase Showdown and Showcase terminology correct. I mean, if you can't do the basic research, why should I listen to your reporting on a show that I've been watching for my whole life?

Also, their correction puts to rest the age-old debate over the cash option. Yes, it may have existed at one time, but not anymore.

Anyway, petty expectations aside, this was a decent portrait of the show as it is today. Most (if not all) of the pictures seem to be from #8561K, the Best of 2018 special, so the article has probably been in the work for some time.

This is just my two cents. You should read the article for yourself.
I thought of a way to improve 2 for the Price of 1, but then I realized that I reinvented Line 'Em Up.

Offline JoePlinko

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Re: Washington Post article re: TPIR
« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2019, 08:28:13 PM »
Great article. 

That's insane that her mother had a heart attack during the show.  I knew exactly who she was when the article stated it.  She was absolutely genuinely excited every time they showed the mother on screen.  Go back and watch it.  Truly amazing.
"If we want the show to stay on, you have to support the show.  How can we lose an American classic?"  - Roger Dobkowitz

Offline JayC

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Re: Washington Post article re: TPIR
« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2019, 10:46:00 PM »
Also, their correction puts to rest the age-old debate over the cash option. Yes, it may have existed at one time, but not anymore.
I remember seeing before that a cash equivalent could be given for at least some electronic items won, and that they gave cash rather than awarding the Apple product that was the prize at one time. Not sure if there are other examples of cash equivalents actually being available.

Offline Flerbert419

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Re: Washington Post article re: TPIR
« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2019, 12:59:27 AM »
Does this part ring true for anybody who has been to the show recently?

Quote from: Washington Post Article
His humor is not always the audience’s humor. At a recent taping, he makes frequent jokes about contestants being high that are largely ignored.

I would think that by now Drew would know which jokes are going to play well to the audience.

I know I'm playing into the fan stereotype here, but the first thing I noticed is that they did get the Showcase Showdown and Showcase terminology correct.

Nope. Last time I checked there were two spots in the Showcase and three in the Showcase Showdown.

"Drew is the greatest at the show that Drew does...how do we make Bob's show Drew's show?"
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Offline gamesurf

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Re: Washington Post article re: TPIR
« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2019, 01:50:45 AM »
Does this part ring true for anybody who has been to the show recently?

I would think that by now Drew would know which jokes are going to play well to the audience.

Heavy on pot jokes. Some landed and some didn't. A lot of his schtick is wandering around the stage and calling on audience members at random and asking about their lives, and then making jokes based off of that. A couple times he starts talking to somebody who under pressure doesn't know how to respond, and he said, "Can you be honest with me? Are you high right now?" Got a laugh. One of his most frequent jokes is to mime smoking a joint when playing a "baked" character and give an obviously ridiculous analysis of what a contestant's told him, he did that about two or three times every break.

Probably should mention the first impression I got from him during the first break really caught me off guard. A rocket scientist (who we met in line) won a car in the first game. During the break Drew built off of that mentioning he was really into the show Strange Angel on CBS All Access, and he wandered off talking about how the show was about a brilliant rocket scientist who fell in the world of the occult and followed Aleister Crowley and performed sex magic rituals and other stuff.

Like, we've been in line for three hours with people who are absolutely thrilled to be here. We watched George Gray's hype video. We had a dance party as soon as we got in the studio. Everyone's full of adrenaline, we just saw five of us people get called down and one of the guys we met in line just got to come on down and is going home with a car. This is a dream come true to be here, could we maybe not talk about Aleister Crowley right this moment? It's kind of a buzzkill.

There was one moment where he called on a Canadian audience member who mentioned he was working in the US. Drew retorted jokingly, "All right, so what job did you take from a hardworking American?" George chimed in, "Build the wall! Build the wall!" I laughed. I could see why some wouldn't.

Overall most of the jokes got a good response. He's a comedian. He takes risks, they don't always pan out, but I'd say upwards of 75% landed. I particularly like effort he makes to spotlight individual contestants and members of the audience. That's when he got his best jibes in, and I felt like I knew the contestants so much better in the studio than I do on the show. We really were rooting for one another, it felt like an enormous family of 300 people, and Drew really felt like he was on "our" side. I really got the vibe he wants to stick it to the man, meet people from all over, and give away as much of CBS' stuff as he can.
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"It's the greatest challenge in the world to invent a new game. For every one you see, every concept that is ultimately refined and developed, a dozen are worked on and not worked on, or almost worked on, or dropped because they don't read any more. We test and hammer and test and hammer...

When you finally get it down so that it looks very very simple, that one has had the most complicated amount of work."

Quote from: Bill Todman
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Offline MSTieScott

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Re: Washington Post article re: TPIR
« Reply #7 on: January 14, 2019, 01:55:18 PM »
This article made me look up the definition of "doyenne." But I'll likely have forgotten the word by next week.


Also, their correction puts to rest the age-old debate over the cash option. Yes, it may have existed at one time, but not anymore.

It never existed. Yes, on occasion the show will award the cash equivalent of a prize (as JayC mentioned), but even then, it isn't an option: The contestant will be getting the cash equivalent of that Christmas tree, whether they like it or not (they like it).


From the article, copy-and-pasted out of order for emphasis:

Quote from: Karen Heller for The Washington Post
Yaniak wins the $36,513 showcase. Her total haul for a few spirited minutes onstage: $62,263.14.

[...]

“Those people in the audience were really rooting for me. It was like a little family,” she says. “There were a bunch of beautiful souls in that room.” And she’s keeping both cars.

I'm glad she had a great time at the show, and I'm glad she won a lot, but...

Quote from: The Washington Post
“Financially, this couldn’t happen at a better time.”

[...]

Contestants do pay taxes
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