Author Topic: Disqualification question  (Read 2176 times)

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Offline moneygamelover

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Re: Disqualification question
« Reply #15 on: December 27, 2019, 12:04:19 AM »
So most of the eligibility requirements seem to make sense. Having not been a contestant on Price for at least ten years, not being an employee of CBS or an affiliate thereof, and not holding or being a candidate for political office seem to make sense.

However, I don't understand why having been a contestant on Let's Make A Deal should make someone ineligible to be a Contestant on The Price is Right. I know both are CBS shows but you'd think they'd operate more independently. Is there any reason why they are intertwined like that.
Adjustments that should be made to pricing games to make them fairer: Secret X: Add a 3rd SP so that perfect pricing ensures a win. 1/2 Off: Add a 4th set of SPs so that perfect pricing ensures a win. Master Key: Add 2 more SPs so that perfect pricing ensures a win. Rat Race: Add 2 more SPs so that perfect pricing ensures a win.

The following pricing games should be retired because there's no way or no easy way to make them fair: Spelling Bee, Plinko, Punch a Bunch, Pass the Buck, Let em Roll.

The following retired pricing games should be revived: $uper $aver, Give or Keep, Buy or Sell, Hurdles, Bump, Penny Ante, Credit Card, On the Spot, Split Decision, Add em Up, Walk of Fame, Barker's Markers.

Offline blozier2006

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Re: Disqualification question
« Reply #16 on: December 27, 2019, 12:39:40 AM »
However, I don't understand why having been a contestant on Let's Make A Deal should make someone ineligible to be a Contestant on The Price is Right. I know both are CBS shows but you'd think they'd operate more independently. Is there any reason why they are intertwined like that.
Back in the day, all game shows had a rule that, if you were on one show, you had to wait a year before going on another (and at least NBC had a rule that you could be on no more than three in a lifetime). Pretty sure the current rule of thumb is "no more than one a year, or three in ten years".

TL;DR: If I read Scott's post right, the problem was doing both shows in less than a week, severely jumping the gun.

Offline SamJ93

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Re: Disqualification question
« Reply #17 on: December 27, 2019, 11:22:50 AM »
On a related note...I was watching a random LMaD ep a few months ago, and one of the contestants had been on the show previously. Wayne noted that contestants have to wait at least 3 years before becoming eligible again. Seems odd that it's so much shorter than TPiR's 10-year limit.

Offline LiteBulb88

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Re: Disqualification question
« Reply #18 on: December 27, 2019, 12:39:08 PM »
The official rule is that you can't be a contestant on both The Price is Right and Let's Make a Deal within one year, based on tape dates. For example, in my case, since I was a contestant on TPiR on an episode taped 2/8/19, I can't be a contestant on LMaD until 2/8 or 2/9/20 (not actually sure which.) Of course, I can go to a taping before then, I just have to tell them I'm ineligible. I don't know the reason behind it.

They don't have to check all 300 audience members. They only have to check the ones they want to select as contestants.

Very good point. I am curious: any idea how many potential contestants TPiR selects in a day? I'm sure it's more than 9, in case a contestant has an emergency or if they change their mind for some reason about someone. But how many more than 9 is it?

Offline gamesurf

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Re: Disqualification question
« Reply #19 on: December 27, 2019, 01:54:57 PM »
I don't know the reason behind it.

IIRC the rule was added as an industry standard after the 50’s scandals to curb “career game show contestants” and prevent the casting process from appearing unfair.

If a contestant were to appear on many different shows in a short period of time, the viewing audience/media/FCC might notice. The shows don’t want to be accused (even wrongfully) of any hanky-panky in their casting process. If a few people got a ton of different contestant roles, it could appear as if there was nepotism/quid pro quo/bias going on in the casting process.

This was more of an issue in the days when there were 20 shows running concentrated on 3 networks, but the rule’s survived to this day.

On a related note...I was watching a random LMaD ep a few months ago, and one of the contestants had been on the show previously. Wayne noted that contestants have to wait at least 3 years before becoming eligible again. Seems odd that it's so much shorter than TPiR's 10-year limit.

My guess is an LMAD season has a much smaller pool of prospective contestants than Price.
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When you finally get it down so that it looks very very simple, that one has had the most complicated amount of work."

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Offline pricefan18

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Re: Disqualification question
« Reply #20 on: December 27, 2019, 03:37:20 PM »
IIRC the rule was added as an industry standard after the 50’s scandals to curb “career game show contestants” and prevent the casting process from appearing unfair.

If a contestant were to appear on many different shows in a short period of time, the viewing audience/media/FCC might notice. The shows don’t want to be accused (even wrongfully) of any hanky-panky in their casting process. If a few people got a ton of different contestant roles, it could appear as if there was nepotism/quid pro quo/bias going on in the casting process.

This was more of an issue in the days when there were 20 shows running concentrated on 3 networks, but the rule’s survived to this day.

I could also see where in the case of Price and LMAD it could get boring from the producers standpoint, to see the same people in the same timeframe on.....but..that is just me.

Offline BillyGr

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Re: Disqualification question
« Reply #21 on: December 27, 2019, 09:30:27 PM »
On a related note...I was watching a random LMaD ep a few months ago, and one of the contestants had been on the show previously. Wayne noted that contestants have to wait at least 3 years before becoming eligible again. Seems odd that it's so much shorter than TPiR's 10-year limit.

My guess is an LMAD season has a much smaller pool of prospective contestants than Price.

Another possibility is because more of any given audience at LMAD become contestants (after all, think of the deals where they bring up 3 people at once, or 1 stays up and what they don't pick goes to several other people).  Thus they need more (total) in the same number of shows than Price does.

Offline COINBOYNYC

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Re: Disqualification question
« Reply #22 on: December 28, 2019, 01:14:03 AM »
If I read Scott's post right, the problem was doing both shows in less than a week

Which means if Weird Al gets selected as a contestant on The Price Is Right, he'd be found to be ineligible because he lost on Jeopardy the previous weekend.   :-D
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Offline pricefan18

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Re: Disqualification question
« Reply #23 on: December 28, 2019, 02:06:28 AM »
They don't have to check all 300 audience members. They only have to check the ones they want to select as contestants.

At one point while I was with the show, there was a string of disqualifications that came about because people would be selected at a taping of Let's Make a Deal, then, less than a week after that taping, go over to The Price Is Right, ignore the eligibility requirements, and get selected for Price before the shared database had been updated with their Deal appearance.

It should go without saying, but don't try to do that. For one thing, procedures have since been changed to prevent that from happening. For another thing, all of those contestants were eventually found out and they didn't get their TPIR prizes anyway.

What have they done to stop it out of curiosity?

Offline lejusteprix

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Re: Disqualification question
« Reply #24 on: December 28, 2019, 06:49:39 AM »
They don't have to check all 300 audience members. They only have to check the ones they want to select as contestants.

At one point while I was with the show, there was a string of disqualifications that came about because people would be selected at a taping of Let's Make a Deal, then, less than a week after that taping, go over to The Price Is Right, ignore the eligibility requirements, and get selected for Price before the shared database had been updated with their Deal appearance.

It should go without saying, but don't try to do that. For one thing, procedures have since been changed to prevent that from happening. For another thing, all of those contestants were eventually found out and they didn't get their TPIR prizes anyway.

To follow up on this, what Scott says is exactly correct; I can speak from experience.  I was on Price in 2015 and on Deal in 2017.  Both times I also saw the other show - with the order being Price then Deal (just the way it worked out).

In 2015, when I went and saw Deal I was asked why I was ineligible by someone who was asking for our information at that show.  I didn't tell them that I had been on Price; rather I told them that I was "at a studio yesterday across town for a show on the same network" and just smiled.  The guy got the hint :)  Also, there were people that recognized me from the day before as they had been at the same Price taping and when they asked I just didn't talk about it!

In 2017 when I saw Price I just told them I had been on the show two years prior, they marked me with an "X" on my number and I went on my merry way!

I can't be 100% sure but I know that either on paper (can't find it) or talking (more likely) we were told not to try getting on the other show before our year eligibility was up.  Perhaps someone who was on the show more recently could speak to this.

In any case both shows were super fun whether you get picked or not.  I highly recommend getting down to LA/Van Nuys to see the shows.

Offline sayingsorry

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Re: Disqualification question
« Reply #25 on: December 30, 2019, 09:52:47 AM »
They don't have to check all 300 audience members. They only have to check the ones they want to select as contestants.

At one point while I was with the show, there was a string of disqualifications that came about because people would be selected at a taping of Let's Make a Deal, then, less than a week after that taping, go over to The Price Is Right, ignore the eligibility requirements, and get selected for Price before the shared database had been updated with their Deal appearance.

It should go without saying, but don't try to do that. For one thing, procedures have since been changed to prevent that from happening. For another thing, all of those contestants were eventually found out and they didn't get their TPIR prizes anyway.

This brings up a question- if someone is disqualified does that mean their eligibility resets and they don't have to wait 10 years since they were not allowed to win a price even though they were called down?

Offline GobGlom

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Re: Disqualification question
« Reply #26 on: December 30, 2019, 10:58:41 AM »
This brings up a question- if someone is disqualified does that mean their eligibility resets and they don't have to wait 10 years since they were not allowed to win a price even though they were called down?

I doubt it. I would think that an ineligibility disqualification would be like a slap on the wrist and a "come back when you are eligible again" speech.

Offline deepmilk

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Re: Disqualification question
« Reply #27 on: January 19, 2020, 08:29:19 PM »
Which means if Weird Al gets selected as a contestant on The Price Is Right, he'd be found to be ineligible because he lost on Jeopardy the previous weekend.   :-D

Well done!  xlx xlx xlx