Author Topic: TPiR Recap - 5/15/2019  (Read 1975 times)

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Online gamesurf

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Re: TPiR Recap - 5/15/2019
« Reply #15 on: May 16, 2019, 07:36:14 PM »
"Skunking" = winless show, a show where nothing is given away in pricing games except insignificant items like SPs, or items that are impossible not to win.

"El Skunko" = a winless show capped off by a Double Overbid.

JayC is exactly right. Presentation is extremely important--in order to "win" a cash game, a contestant must win the big amount announced at the beginning of the game. Winning an amount of cash besides the top amount (like the $1,000 bonus in 1/2 off) is a "partial win". Since she won no cash at all, it's a "loss".

One interesting quirk of that rule is it makes some games near impossible to lose entirely. If they had played Plinko instead of 1/2 off, and the contestant only won $100, it would not have been a skunking or "winless show". It would have been "five losses and a partial win", despite the contestant winning potentially even less.

Forgive me if this is a dumb question, but what makes for a skunked show (as opposed to just a winless one)?  Does the fact that a couple of small prizes were won in 1/2 Off count for anything?

(Maybe we should have a TPiR glossary or TPiR Wiktionary.)

Check out the G-R.net FAQ if you haven't already, it's one of the best resources about the show available on the net!
« Last Edit: May 16, 2019, 07:40:03 PM by gamesurf »
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