Author Topic: Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?  (Read 3156 times)

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Online goldroadfanatic

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Re: Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?
« Reply #45 on: May 26, 2019, 10:38:20 PM »
I was under the impression that the rules were a little looser for the celebrity shows - not in a "game shows are fixed!" or "they're lettin' 'em cheat" sense, but more along the lines of, well, they're celebrities and the money is going to charity.  Celebrities not in the Hot Seat were allowed to throw out "hints" during the first five questions, and each celebrity was guaranteed a minimum amount for their charity.  ($25,000?  $32,000?)

During the ABC primetime era, the celebrities were guaranteed $32,000 for their charities.  As a result, the celebrities in the Fastest Finger circle could help out the celebrity in the Hot Seat for the first 10 questions.  However, starting with the $64,000 question, the celebrity in the Hot Seat was on their own (with any lifelines they still had, of course).
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Offline COINBOYNYC

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Re: Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?
« Reply #46 on: May 26, 2019, 10:53:18 PM »
Even so, since all the money was going to charity, Regis and the show played things a little more looser than they would with a "real" contestant.  For example, Norm, the last person to make it into the Hot Seat, insisted on a Fastest Finger question, so they came up with one specifically for him:

Put the following letters in order to spell a popular man's name.
A) N
B) O
C) R
D) M


I'm not going to spoil it for anyone who hasn't seen the episode yet.   :-D
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Offline ThomHuge

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Re: Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?
« Reply #47 on: May 26, 2019, 10:58:34 PM »
I'm not going to spoil it for anyone who hasn't seen the episode yet.   :-D

I remember when it aired it was part of ABC's "pop up trivia" thing. I also remember the popups while Norm entered his answer: "This. Made. Norm. Mad."

Good times!

Offline pricefan18

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Re: Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?
« Reply #48 on: May 27, 2019, 07:34:03 AM »
During the ABC primetime era, the celebrities were guaranteed $32,000 for their charities.  As a result, the celebrities in the Fastest Finger circle could help out the celebrity in the Hot Seat for the first 10 questions.  However, starting with the $64,000 question, the celebrity in the Hot Seat was on their own (with any lifelines they still had, of course).

I honestly never liked that format. I am okay with a minimum amount even if you bomb out, but I woulda preferred they earn their way up the ladder completely. Other celeb versions did that (see Richard Hatch in Australia). I think woulda made for better TV to see who did well and who didn't.

Online goldroadfanatic

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Re: Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?
« Reply #49 on: May 27, 2019, 09:00:56 AM »
I think it would make for bad television to see a celebrity lose money for a charity.  With that rationale, it was better for the celebrity to get to a sizable amount, $32,000, with help from the other celebrities, then see how much more they can earn for charity by climbing the upper tier.

At least one celebrity bombed out in the middle tier: Gene Simmons, who missed his $16,000 question.  However, instead of deducting $7,000 and donating $1,000 to his charity, the show donated the guaranteed $32,000.
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Offline JayC

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Re: Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?
« Reply #50 on: May 27, 2019, 11:32:45 AM »
Even so, since all the money was going to charity, Regis and the show played things a little more looser than they would with a "real" contestant.
Weren't all of the Fastest Fingers when they got to the last celebrity jokey like that since they were the last contestant to play?

I didn't mind the format on the celebrity shows, some of the banter and antics for the hints were funny and they did have to make sure the contestants got at least the $32,000 for their charities.

Offline gamesurf

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Re: Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?
« Reply #51 on: May 27, 2019, 01:43:34 PM »
I didn't mind the format on the celebrity shows, some of the banter and antics for the hints were funny and they did have to make sure the contestants got at least the $32,000 for their charities.

Yeah, on their own they were a fun change of pace.

The problem was when they cut it to two nights a week, one civilian and one celebrity. You had to flip flop between celebrity and civilian contestants all the time, it was impossible to steadily follow one narrative or the other unless you ignored half of the episodes.
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Offline someguy23475

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Re: Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?
« Reply #52 on: May 27, 2019, 02:40:01 PM »
The celebrity shows were unwatchable. The fact others could shout out the answers gave it a rigged feeling. I know the money went to charity, but it just isnít fun watching annoying millionaires goofing around pretending they care. Maybe they actually do, but it didnít seem like it.

Offline pricefan18

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Re: Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?
« Reply #53 on: May 27, 2019, 04:48:41 PM »
The celebrity shows were unwatchable. The fact others could shout out the answers gave it a rigged feeling. I know the money went to charity, but it just isnít fun watching annoying millionaires goofing around pretending they care. Maybe they actually do, but it didnít seem like it.

Yeah, I wonder if the ratings woulda done better if they treated it a bit more seriously. Millionaire isn't a show that works with comedy like they played it with these back then.

Offline whowouldeverhurtawhammy

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Re: Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?
« Reply #54 on: May 27, 2019, 08:59:57 PM »
The contestants were chosen in a more traditional format ie. personality over smarts. At least that's the interpretation I got by reading the Wikipedia page.

Another reason why we had almost no millionaires in the syndicated run. The show's about knowledge, not personalities.
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