Author Topic: Press Your Luck: The Card Game!  (Read 898 times)

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Offline jlgarfield

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Press Your Luck: The Card Game!
« on: May 21, 2019, 02:25:31 AM »
You know, with all the excitement of Press Your Luck coming back, I have been thinking: For the past two years, I have found out that this game show would be a great game to turn in to a card game form.

But how would it work? I'm open to your ideas. :D

Offline gamesurf

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Re: Press Your Luck: The Card Game!
« Reply #1 on: May 21, 2019, 05:21:03 AM »
Seems pretty simple to make a passable one—get a bunch of cards with dollar amounts, prizes, and whammies. Shuffle them and draw one—that’s a spin. Collect cards until a whammy is drawn, after which all the player’s cards get shuffled in the deck. Question round can be buzz in by slapping the table or Second Chance “write your answer” style or Whammy R1 or whatever variant you like.

That being said, much of what makes PYL great can’t be replicated in a card game. It’d be fun to see someone creative use the PYL license and turn it into something very different, like Monopoly Deal or Scrabble Slam.
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Offline pannoni1

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Re: Press Your Luck: The Card Game!
« Reply #2 on: May 21, 2019, 08:17:40 AM »
I'd just go for a PYL/CS crossover since both are coming back. A contestant is given a card and must guess if the next card has more or less money. If correct, the dollar figure is added to the bank and the contestant may freeze at any time. Prize cards function not as bonus prizes in the Rafferty version, but cards themselves; the value of the prize must correctly be called as being more or less. Typical Round 1 dollar figures are used in the cards ($200-$1500, meaning that an $600 or $700 amount is "up the middle"). No "extra spin" cards are found. 54 cards are used to honor the 54 spots on the Big Board.

Unlike on standard CS, a wrong guess on the card simply ends the player's turn and passes it over to the other player if they didn't have a turn yet for that question. However, this is where the Whammy comes in: if a Whammy card is drawn, that player not only loses whatever money they've accumulated, but they also lose all cards that they didn't freeze on. If a player gets three Whammies, then the game automatically goes to their opponent. This also complicates the strategy for changing cards if a contestant wins a question; they may have a middling amount like $450 or $850, but may find that if they change their card and hit a Whammy, then their turn automatically ends. As always, the first to turn over four cards (two in round 2) successfully wins that round.

As far as the questions, each correct answer gets "1 card turns" for the Money Cards as explained below, but if a player guesses exactly on the nose, they get three "card turns". You still have the "we asked 100 people" questions, but some of those "What fraction to the nearest quarter" or "to the nearest ten percent" questions will periodically appear to provide a better opportunity to rack up spins.

The Money Cards aren't measured in fixed lines, but based on the "spins" that the player earned during the front game, where a contestant draws cards in hopes of racking up lots of prizes. This round features cash cards from $500-$5,000, some extra spin cards, better prizes including cars, overseas trips, and rooms of furniture are featured, as well as a special "Double your $$" card. While a contestant can quit at any point, any unused spins result in a partial reduction of their total bank by 10% (including prizes) or an accumulated prize for each remaining spin. For example, if a player has $10,000 and of that, $5000 comes from two prizes totaling that value altogether, a player with two remaining cards can either press on, or "pass out" by either forfeiting the prizes, or taking $2000 from his/her cash winnings, or some combo of both ($1,000 in cash or one prize).

So, while my idea is far from perfect, is just an interesting mash-up from these two great games!
« Last Edit: May 21, 2019, 08:19:54 AM by pannoni1 »
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Offline tpir04

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Re: Press Your Luck: The Card Game!
« Reply #3 on: May 21, 2019, 08:08:33 PM »
This is an idea I've had for a while, but I haven't hammered out any flaws yet. It's not exactly a card game, in the strict sense of the term, but it does merit sharing:

For three people or more; I recommend 3-5. More than that, and the game is probably going to be agonizingly boring.

Contents: special PYL cards, including $$, $$+spins, prizes, "directional spaces" (the `Move 1 Space, Pick-a-Corner, etc.) and, of course, Whammies; "Big Board" template, with numbered spaces 1-18; spinner (or die, or whatever); question cards; 15-second timer; instructions (duh!).

To setup: Deal 18 cards, one on each space on the Big Board template, and set the rest of the cards aside. This becomes the "Big Board" for the game. (Only one round is recommended, for purposes of time. If more rounds are played, simply collect the cards after each round, shuffle, and redeal.)

Play: Select an emcee. Said emcee will draw a question card from the deck and read it to the player on his left. The cards will be Family Feud-style ("Name a..."). Immediately after the emcee finishes, the timer is flipped, and the player will attempt to rattle off as many answers as possible. Each answer that fits the question equals one spin on the Big Board. The emcee position passes to the left, and so does the player answering questions. Repeat this process until everyone has had a chance to answer a question. The emcee position subsequently ceases, as it is no longer needed.

NOTE: As an alternative, the individual questioning can be thrown out, and instead do the questions with everybody at once. The emcee position still rotates, to give everyone a fair shot. (In this case, however, the questions will have to have a correct answer and two multiple-choice answers not open-ended as in Family Feud. A correct answer earns you three spins and a correct multiple-choice answer gets you one spin.)

However, I tend to favor the first set of rules, for two reasons:

1) It ensures that there are no arguments over who answered first, and
2) It ensures that everybody gets at least one spin, and thus nobody hogs all the spins.

Anyways, now it is time to face the Big Board.

Whoever has the most spins will go first. Spin the spinner. Whatever number the spinner stops on corresponds to a space on the Big Board. (At this point there are two options: either 1) collect the card and keep it in front of you, replacing the cards as they are removed, or 2) simply record the result on paper, leaving the cards where they are. I favor the former for two reasons: 1) It helps to have a stack of cash cards in front of you, instead of numbers on paper, and 2) the Big Board will change, like it does on the show.) If a Whammy is hit, the player must discard all cash and prizes he accumulated up to that point. At any point during the game, a player can pass his leftover spins, as in the show. They will go to the player with the highest cash amount at the time. Play stops, and the player on the receiving end of those spins will play immediately. If a Whammy is hit, the rest of the spins turn into earned spins and the player is then free to do with them what he wishes. As always, four Whammies eliminates a player from the game. He must return all cards, Whammies included, to the discard pile and withdraw from the game. Said player may now weep quietly.

After all spins have been used, count up the cash and prizes. Whoever has the highest total is the Press Your Luck champion!

So there you have it. Constructive criticism is always accepted and encouraged!
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Offline jaywilliams

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Re: Press Your Luck: The Card Game!
« Reply #4 on: June 05, 2019, 05:52:04 PM »
This is an idea I've had for a while, but I haven't hammered out any flaws yet. It's not exactly a card game, in the strict sense of the term, but it does merit sharing:

For three people or more; I recommend 3-5. More than that, and the game is probably going to be agonizingly boring.

Contents: special PYL cards, including $$, $$+spins, prizes, "directional spaces" (the `Move 1 Space, Pick-a-Corner, etc.) and, of course, Whammies; "Big Board" template, with numbered spaces 1-18; spinner (or die, or whatever); question cards; 15-second timer; instructions (duh!).

To setup: Deal 18 cards, one on each space on the Big Board template, and set the rest of the cards aside. This becomes the "Big Board" for the game. (Only one round is recommended, for purposes of time. If more rounds are played, simply collect the cards after each round, shuffle, and redeal.)

Play: Select an emcee. Said emcee will draw a question card from the deck and read it to the player on his left. The cards will be Family Feud-style ("Name a..."). Immediately after the emcee finishes, the timer is flipped, and the player will attempt to rattle off as many answers as possible. Each answer that fits the question equals one spin on the Big Board. The emcee position passes to the left, and so does the player answering questions. Repeat this process until everyone has had a chance to answer a question. The emcee position subsequently ceases, as it is no longer needed.

NOTE: As an alternative, the individual questioning can be thrown out, and instead do the questions with everybody at once. The emcee position still rotates, to give everyone a fair shot. (In this case, however, the questions will have to have a correct answer and two multiple-choice answers not open-ended as in Family Feud. A correct answer earns you three spins and a correct multiple-choice answer gets you one spin.)

However, I tend to favor the first set of rules, for two reasons:

1) It ensures that there are no arguments over who answered first, and
2) It ensures that everybody gets at least one spin, and thus nobody hogs all the spins.

Anyways, now it is time to face the Big Board.

Whoever has the most spins will go first. Spin the spinner. Whatever number the spinner stops on corresponds to a space on the Big Board. (At this point there are two options: either 1) collect the card and keep it in front of you, replacing the cards as they are removed, or 2) simply record the result on paper, leaving the cards where they are. I favor the former for two reasons: 1) It helps to have a stack of cash cards in front of you, instead of numbers on paper, and 2) the Big Board will change, like it does on the show.) If a Whammy is hit, the player must discard all cash and prizes he accumulated up to that point. At any point during the game, a player can pass his leftover spins, as in the show. They will go to the player with the highest cash amount at the time. Play stops, and the player on the receiving end of those spins will play immediately. If a Whammy is hit, the rest of the spins turn into earned spins and the player is then free to do with them what he wishes. As always, four Whammies eliminates a player from the game. He must return all cards, Whammies included, to the discard pile and withdraw from the game. Said player may now weep quietly.

After all spins have been used, count up the cash and prizes. Whoever has the highest total is the Press Your Luck champion!

So there you have it. Constructive criticism is always accepted and encouraged!
This is a great format for a Press Your Luck board or card game. This should be pitched to Endless Games and Cardinal Industries for their 2020 lineup (the two game makers that I know of that does Fremantle merchandise).
Jay Williams