Author Topic: Panic-stricken games  (Read 757 times)

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Offline LarryC

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Panic-stricken games
« on: June 17, 2020, 02:15:02 PM »
Today's rerun featured (bad) playings of Ten Chances and Time Is Money.  In both, the contestant was obviously grasping at straws, might not clearly understand the game, and panicked. 

Switcheroo also comes to mind as a game where it's often a free-for-all panic fest.

Is there any way to restage/differently-explain/do something with such games where there's a more solid & precise feel to them?  The games themselves aren't bad -- but frenzied playings of them aren't much fun to watch.  (In contrast to more measured & methodical games like Golden Road, Any Number, Temptation, et al.)

Offline SeaBreeze341

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Re: Panic-stricken games
« Reply #1 on: June 17, 2020, 02:24:57 PM »
Other than a better explanation or a verbal example from Drew, I don't think there's much that can be done.  I think Drew does a good job in terms of what to do and what not to do with the PG's and the other segments.

I remember a recent Clock Game playing where Drew had to intervene to try to calm the contestant down.  As mentioned I think it's a rare situation of a nervous contestant.  Things are probably tougher live as opposed to watching at home
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Offline LiteBulb88

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Re: Panic-stricken games
« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2020, 02:39:21 PM »
In both cases in today's rerun, the contestant seemed to know the goal of the game, they just didn't know the strategy to meet the goal. That's not something Drew should be explaining; that's something contestants need to figure out, ideally before going to the show at all. Another thing that can get in the contestant's way is their nerves; the producers are making educated guesses based on 30 second interviews about which contestants will thrive under the lights and which ones will wilt.

Offline gamesurf

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Re: Panic-stricken games
« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2020, 02:41:38 PM »
There really isn’t a way to get people ready. For most people it really does seem like sensory overload to suddenly be on stage in front of hundreds, standing next to a celebrity, surrounded by cameras, and with thousands of prizes at stake. It’s hard enough to answer “what is your name and what do you do” coherently.

You wouldn’t believe how much dead time gets edited out as people poll the audience for the simplest answers. I really don’t think your average contestant can be blamed for not thinking things through on any PG. It’s just much more obvious on timed games since nothing can be edited out.
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Offline jhc2010

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Re: Panic-stricken games
« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2020, 05:41:18 PM »
Ten Chances has gotten far less panicked since the producers allow contestants plenty of time to write their guesses. Back in the day, if it even looked like the contestant was just thinking for one second, Bob would demand the contestants to begin writing and then add, “you have ten seconds or you’ll lose your turn.”

Countdowns naturally lead to a heightened sense of urgency and some contestants handle this urgency better than others. I’ve long thought that Drew could add to these games by giving play-by-play of what the contestant is doing instead of solely counting down the money remaining. Watch a playing of Time is Money. All Drew does is provide everyone watching with an an audio countdown of the money which is already visible on the screen. “Sixteen-thousand. Fifteen thousand. Fourteen thousand... A couple hundred bucks” I’m not sure if the producers tell him to do this because the contestant cannot easily see the countdown with their back to the display. Drew never mentions the products or any of the contestant’s movements of products. I am tired of hearing Drew’s countdown from “nineteen thousand” every time the second portion of Time is Money is played.

Also, when Drew SCREAMS numbers when a countdown is about to end, this leads to panic. I’ve heard him do this the loudest when playing Hot Seat and the countdown timer is low. I’ve also heard him scream numbers during Switcheroo.

Offline tpiradam

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Re: Panic-stricken games
« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2020, 06:44:02 PM »
Split Decision was the first one to come to mind. Panic was the case for the majority of 'bad' playings in my opinion.

Offline Briguy

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Re: Panic-stricken games
« Reply #6 on: June 19, 2020, 03:22:27 PM »
I think a lot of it is being mentally prepared.

Sure, it's completely different when you're in a studio, in front of lights, cameras and hundreds of people (in the studio) and knowing tha millions of others will be watching. But still, it pays to be mentally ready, knowing you can be called on down at any moment and that you may win your way on stage to play any game.

Brian

Offline Briguy

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Re: Panic-stricken games
« Reply #7 on: June 22, 2020, 01:20:52 PM »
OK, here's a question about Ten Chances and the old "10-second rule" that may or may not fit here:

There are at least a couple of episodes in circulation that have this rule enforced, and have been rerun (on GSN) and are posted on YouTube. My question is, to anyone's recollection – since they likely have not been rerun for any number of reasons – has a contestant lost more than one turn playing Ten Chances? That is, spending too much time consulting with the audience, fumbling with a guess or otherwise wasting time.

(For the record, I don't remember that happening ... heck, the first time I saw the rule enforced was with the reruns.)

Brian