Author Topic: Cameras in the Audience Pit  (Read 430 times)

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Offline The Big Wheel

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Cameras in the Audience Pit
« on: June 26, 2020, 07:09:17 AM »
Take a look at this picture from the Carol Burnett Show in October, 1967.



You can clearly see the show's orchestra section off in the wings as well as stairs that lead upstairs to the suite above the studio.

But there is a camera in the audience pit placed in the area of today's "contestant's row". As heavy as the cameras are, does anyone know if this was a popular practice around this time and what the advantage of this would be as opposed to using a camera in the back or one on a Chapman Crane on the ramp?

As a side note, does anyone know of any major changes to the audience seating and stage area between the time this picture was taken to before the start of Price in 1972?
Life moves pretty fast; if you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it!

Offline priceguy

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Re: Cameras in the Audience Pit
« Reply #1 on: June 26, 2020, 07:43:54 PM »
As a side note, does anyone know of any major changes to the audience seating and stage area between the time this picture was taken to before the start of Price in 1972?

Well looking at this picture alone, there seems to be an extra mini-row of 3 seats at the very front. Other major differences, I don't know.

Offline BillyGr

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Re: Cameras in the Audience Pit
« Reply #2 on: June 26, 2020, 08:35:44 PM »
Perhaps the cameras at that time would have had a difficult time getting the desired close up of someone standing where Carol is from other angles (either on the stage itself or way in the back of the audience, if there was even a spot back there for one then)?


Offline shell_game

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Re: Cameras in the Audience Pit
« Reply #3 on: June 26, 2020, 09:52:35 PM »
It was likely all about the angle. Carol opened every show with a popular Q&A segment. I'm guessing the from-the-floor shot was used to give the perspective of those in the audience who were asking the questions.