Author Topic: How would you explain certain pricing games (or parts thereof)?  (Read 1540 times)

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Offline b_masters8

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How would you explain certain pricing games (or parts thereof)?
« on: November 08, 2022, 05:04:21 AM »
If you could make your own explanation of the rules of certain pricing games (or parts of them), how specifically would you phrase said explanation?

I, for instance, would phrase the big go-or-stay decision on Grand Game this way (when/if you got to $1000, you had to make that choice):

"You have now reached $1000, and there is one more product (out of the three remaining) that is lower-priced than our target price. You can keep the $1000 that you have and call the game, or you can go on and try to correctly choose that product. If you do indeed correctly choose that product, you will be bumped up to/win $10,000; else, nothing (you lose the $1000). What would you like to do?

Offline jhc2010

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Re: How would you explain certain pricing games (or parts thereof)?
« Reply #1 on: November 08, 2022, 07:40:06 AM »
I’d include something about the face cards in Card Game because Drew usually doesn’t mention the face cards during his lengthy explanation of the game. He also usually doesn’t use the phrase “without going over” in Card Game and instead choosing to discuss the winning range.

Offline SeaBreeze341

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Re: How would you explain certain pricing games (or parts thereof)?
« Reply #2 on: November 08, 2022, 09:19:14 AM »
For the most part, I think Drew Carey does a very good job when it comes to the explanation of the rules.  It’s not perfect, it’s not Bob Barker style.  To be honest, and in my opinion, it can feel a little vague, but it’s in his comfort level.  I think he does it to the point where it isn’t confusing.  For example, Clock Game he warns people to listen to him saying higher & lower (which Bob did himself early on). 

I think he does a great job with Do the Math and timed games like Race Game & Time is Money.  Not so much the rules, but advice, such as, “Don’t listen to the audience.  Go with your own gut, as every second (or dollar) counts in the game.”  Finally, I think he handles the Showcase Showdown very well, specifically when it comes to bonus spins.

Anyway, sorry to digress, but I might trend toward what I’d leave out instead of what I’d add.  For instance, I wouldn’t say stuff like, “Nobody cares about those small prizes in Switcheroo.”  As a matter of fact, I’d go the other way and say, “While the car is important and the other stuff isn’t, it try to price those other items to help eliminate the choice of the tens digit for the car.  The more you know about the prices of the small products the better shot you have at the car.”

For Hole in One, I’d focus on trying to get as close to the hole as possible, but instead of worrying about putting everything in order I’d take it one grocery prize at a time.  I’d say, “Trying to make sure that the grocery product you’re picking is higher than your previous selection.”  That way, if you sort of messed up, you don’t go for the least expensive one.  Otherwise, you’d be putting at the first (or second) line.  For example, if you picked the third expensive product first or second, rather than going for the least expensive, try to pick a higher priced item, hopefully both.

This way, you know you’re not winning $500, and you would not be putting from the sixth line.  However, by messing up, you try to recover and get toward the middle with a better shot at winning the game
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Offline b_masters8

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Re: How would you explain certain pricing games (or parts thereof)?
« Reply #3 on: November 08, 2022, 01:15:15 PM »
And for Temptation, when it got to the point where you had to make the choice of either keeping the prizes or risking them for the car, I'd have it as, "This is why this game is called Temptation: we have given you $X amount of prizes/cash in total, and you have a choice to make-- you can keep these prizes and call the game right here, or you can risk them for the car. If you risk them for the car, we will show you all the numbers; if all of them are correct, you win the car and these prizes with it; else (if even one number is wrong), nothing. It's a tempting choice. What would you like to do here?"

Offline gamesurf

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Re: How would you explain certain pricing games (or parts thereof)?
« Reply #4 on: November 08, 2022, 01:20:06 PM »
“I want to give you between $8,000 and $9,000 of prizes, but the bedroom is less than $8,000. How much money do you need to add to the price of the bedroom to total more than $8,000 but less than $9,000? Get it right and you win the bedroom AND the cash.”
Quote from: Bill Todman
"The sign of a good game, is when you don't have to explain it every day. The key is not simplicity, but apparent simplicity. Password looks like any idiot could have made it up, but we have 14 of our people working on that show. There is a great complexity behind the screen. It requires great work to keep it simple."

Offline ooboh

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Re: How would you explain certain pricing games (or parts thereof)?
« Reply #5 on: November 08, 2022, 04:09:17 PM »
“I’m going to show you up to 10 prices for that car, none of which are actually the price of the car. Your job is to shout ‘That’s Too Much!’ the moment I reveal the first price that is more than the price of the car. It has to be the FIRST price.”

Alternate explanation:
“Your job is to pick the price that is closest to the actual retail price of the car WHILE going over. In this game, you’re SUPPOSED to go over.”

Offline jlgarfield

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Re: How would you explain certain pricing games (or parts thereof)?
« Reply #6 on: November 08, 2022, 06:32:34 PM »
Race Game: "What you want to do is to put all of those price tags on their accompanying racks here; then once you have them all down, you will push down on this lever (on the jukebox). Continue this process until you either get all four right, or time expires, whichever comes first. You will have as many times to get it within 45 seconds, but be advised that this is a race against time, so you have to be quick on your feet and move as quickly as you can."

Offline rick420buzz

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Re: How would you explain certain pricing games (or parts thereof)?
« Reply #7 on: November 09, 2022, 02:51:58 PM »
"Write the check for an amount. We will show the price of the prize and add it to the check. If the total is between $8,000 and $9,000 you win"

My other version, in BASIC:

input "Value of check"; x
input "Price of prize"; y
z = x + y
if z >= 8000 and z <= 9000
   print "WIN!"
   else
      print "LOSS"
endif

Offline PIRfanSince72

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Re: How would you explain certain pricing games (or parts thereof)?
« Reply #8 on: November 10, 2022, 02:18:26 PM »
I love this thread!  Mercy I could do one for every pricing game!

For That's Too Much!  I would say "If you believe the actual retail price of the car falls in between the last two prices exposed on the board, that's the time to yell out "That's Too Much!".


Offline jhc2010

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Re: How would you explain certain pricing games (or parts thereof)?
« Reply #9 on: November 11, 2022, 09:19:15 PM »
For That's Too Much!  I would say "If you believe the actual retail price of the car falls in between the last two prices exposed on the board, that's the time to yell out "That's Too Much!".
For That's Too Much, Bob's explanation where he said, "The moment that you see a price higher than the price of the car, yell out 'that's too much'. If you're right, you're a winner." I don't think it needs to be any more complicated than that.

Offline b_masters8

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Re: How would you explain certain pricing games (or parts thereof)?
« Reply #10 on: November 16, 2022, 08:02:04 AM »
On Bonus Game: "That prize that we just showed you is a bonus prize, and you will only win it if you are correct with your higher/lower guess (win that small prize) on the one of these smaller prizes that is marked with the word "BONUS" in its window. You do not have to win all of them (that would be optimal); all you have to do is be controlling the window that has "BONUS" in it at the end of the game."

Offline SeaBreeze341

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Re: How would you explain certain pricing games (or parts thereof)?
« Reply #11 on: November 16, 2022, 11:34:40 PM »
Nothing to see here
« Last Edit: November 16, 2022, 11:36:52 PM by SeaBreeze341 »
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Offline pannoni1

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Re: How would you explain certain pricing games (or parts thereof)?
« Reply #12 on: November 17, 2022, 09:33:52 AM »
Gas Money: "There are five prices shown here, one of them is the price of the car. What you need to do is to pick out the four prices that are NOT the price of that car in order to win it. Along the way, with each successful pick, you will win cash between $1,000 and $4,000, where you can stop along the way, since if you select the price that's the actual price of that car, you will lose everything. With that said, think of the price of the car and pick one of the other prices in order."

Grocery Game: "Try to zero in on the price by taking a little at a time since so many contestants go over by picking so much of one item, and you'll find that it will be easier after having a shorter target to reach if you play things carefully."

Hot Seat on locking in responses: "Be sure you're 100% certain about whether a product is higher or lower, because once you press that button, just like we do for the Range Game, you can't change your mind."

Pay The Rent for choosing the first item: "Because there's only one item in the mailbox, try to pick out a product that is more expensive than two of the other products, but less expensive than three others, since as long as each floor is more expensive than the previous one, you will continue on, so there's really no point in choosing the cheapest item to start things off since just one of the items on the next two levels needs to be more expensive than this."

Secret "X": "You can only win by making a tic-tac-toe horizontally or diagonally with the support of the Secret "X" that will be revealed behind one of these red question mark blocks at the end of the game, as you cannot win with a vertical tic-tac-toe."

That's Too Much!: "Think of the actual retail price of that car right now. What you'll see are various dollar amounts, increasing one by one, that aren't the price of that car over there. As soon as you see the first dollar amount that's more than the value of that car, yell out 'That's Too Much!' like you really mean it." (Also do Bob's demonstration of yelling "That's Too Much!" like authority)
« Last Edit: November 17, 2022, 09:36:31 AM by pannoni1 »
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Offline actual_retail_tice

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Re: How would you explain certain pricing games (or parts thereof)?
« Reply #13 on: November 19, 2022, 09:31:36 AM »
Check Game: "Take a look at what I have for you here: a pen and a blank check! Do you realize what that means? You can write that check for whatever amount of money you want! But, hold on. There are limits if you actually want us to give you that money. You only win if the check and the price of the prize add up to between $8000 and $9000. So don't write it for too much money or when we add it to the prize, it will go over $9000. But don't go too low, or the check and the prize won't add up to enough. Write it for just the right amount, so that when we add it to the price of the prize, the total falls between $8000 and $9000. Do that and you win the whole package."
« Last Edit: November 19, 2022, 09:33:46 AM by actual_retail_tice »

Offline b_masters8

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Re: How would you explain certain pricing games (or parts thereof)?
« Reply #14 on: November 21, 2022, 05:36:33 PM »
Double Prices, one of the simplest games: "One prize, two possible prices. Easiest decision in the world, but also the hardest; which price do you think best fits this prize (IOW, how much do you think this prize is worth)? Get it right, and you win."