Author Topic: Doug Davidson version  (Read 1859 times)

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Offline Alfonzo

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Re: Doug Davidson version
« Reply #15 on: June 10, 2024, 03:43:23 PM »
Facts. After WWOR in New York City and KNBC in Los Angeles announced in December 1994 that they were both dropping the show, syndicator Paramount threw in the towel a week later and announced that production would cease in January 1995. KNBC aired Price against Wheel of Fortune and had lost half of its audience from the previous year. WWOR aired it against Oprah and decided to replace it in its time slot with its popular Richard Bey talk show, which they were moving to national syndication that January.
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Offline imhomerjay

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Re: Doug Davidson version
« Reply #16 on: June 10, 2024, 05:24:23 PM »
IIRC, KNBC was plugging the prime time access hole left by Hard Copy and Entertainment Tonight. Throw in the viewers who followed those shows over to KCBS because that’s what they wanted and the dominance of Wheel in the access game show space, and you have a recipe for failure. Faithful to the daytime, not faithful—there was just no way it was catching on.

Offline pannoni1

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Re: Doug Davidson version
« Reply #17 on: June 11, 2024, 08:53:55 AM »

In the DC-Baltimore area, WDCA aired TNPiR at 12:30 AM, while WJZ aired it at 2:05 AM only on Tuesday-Friday overnights, with COPS reruns on late nght Mondays. WGAL in Lancaster, PA also aired it at the same post-NBC late night block time as WJZ did. The mid-90s vibe was about being dark and edgy with the grunge and gangsta rap music genres being at their best, and while the darker set tries to embodies these trends and its single SCSD with a solo Showcase Bonus Round tries to be something different, just like what Max Headroom was trying to do with New Coke after the return of Coca-Cola Classic, it just never could resonate with those used to the real thing, and even Bob made note of this version as being the inferior version on at least one episode during its run. 

I firmly believe the Davidson version failed for 3 reasons.

1. Game shows just weren't popular enough at the time for it to gain enough traction.

IMO the nadir of the game show was around the late spring of 1996, after the Family Channel had dumped most of its remaining game shows including Name That Tune, Masters of the Maze, and Trivial Pursuit, leaving just Family Challenge which was just rerunning the Ray Combs shows by that point, and Nickelodeon didn't produce ANY new game shows that year. Heck, you couldn't even find Family Feud anywhere! It was basically daytime TPIR, Wheel, Jeopardy!, and MTV's Singled Out. USA was only airing Love Connection reruns. Then the premiere of Debt that June was the first hint of the genre's turnaround, which continued a bit with The Family Channel's 1996-97 lineup (including the return of Shop 'Til You Drop), and then a few months TPIR begins to air on Game Show Network around the time that a lot of cable providers start adding it to the lineup.
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Offline imhomerjay

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Re: Doug Davidson version
« Reply #18 on: June 11, 2024, 11:00:27 AM »
In the DC-Baltimore area, WDCA aired TNPiR at 12:30 AM, while WJZ aired it at 2:05 AM only on Tuesday-Friday overnights, with COPS reruns on late nght Mondays. WGAL in Lancaster, PA also aired it at the same post-NBC late night block time as WJZ did.
Ouch. Hardly the only shows to have that fate in various markets over the years, but that's a hard hill to climb.

The mid-90s vibe was about being dark and edgy with the grunge and gangsta rap music genres being at their best, and while the darker set tries to embodies these trends and its single SCSD with a solo Showcase Bonus Round tries to be something different, just like what Max Headroom was trying to do with New Coke after the return of Coca-Cola Classic, it just never could resonate with those used to the real thing,
I think that might be ascribing a bit much to the design. Whatever there was to say about Davidson's show, gangsta rap and grunge I would say had no influence. It felt at times like the vibe of the opening of the mid-80s primetime specials, just adding some design changes to the set moreso than those specials. If you want to be different than the technicolor daytime vibe, that kind of naturally leads you to something darker without it being about the "vibe" of certain other pieces of pop culture.

and even Bob made note of this version as being the inferior version on at least one episode during its run.
He was a bit cranky, and not terribly filtered about it, even though it was really not impacting him. 

IMO the nadir of the game show was around the late spring of 1996, after the Family Channel had dumped most of its remaining game shows including Name That Tune, Masters of the Maze, and Trivial Pursuit, leaving just Family Challenge which was just rerunning the Ray Combs shows by that point, and Nickelodeon didn't produce ANY new game shows that year. Heck, you couldn't even find Family Feud anywhere! It was basically daytime TPIR, Wheel, Jeopardy!, and MTV's Singled Out. USA was only airing Love Connection reruns. Then the premiere of Debt that June was the first hint of the genre's turnaround, which continued a bit with The Family Channel's 1996-97 lineup (including the return of Shop 'Til You Drop), and then a few months TPIR begins to air on Game Show Network around the time that a lot of cable providers start adding it to the lineup.
Once Wheel and Jeopardy became kings of the hill, it did take a while for syndicators to find a formula for moderate success. How littered was the landscape of the late 80s through the 90s with middling results? It's easy to point to some of the laughable efforts -- I'm looking at you, Tic Tac Dough -- but even shows that weren't as poorly executed were basically roadkill.

It helped a bit when the target was more counter programming other day pats than taking on the big dogs head-on. In first-run, the first really successful prime-access competitor was Hollywood Squares, thanks to the CBS backing and really being more about the comedy than the game (and being well produced all around). Heck, that's largely been the factor behind Feud's longevity. Once Steve got there and they leaned hard into his reactions and questions that basically want euphemisms for body parts and, well...actions, it took off. Not saying that's good, bad or indifferent, but it just is. When they played it more like the original versions where those kinds of things were genuinely rare and amusing, it plodded along barely making a ripple.

Offline Chelsea

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Re: Doug Davidson version
« Reply #19 on: June 12, 2024, 12:09:00 AM »
Re: OJ Simpson: OJ was the final nail in the coffin for Feud, not Price. That show had been on life support for the better part of two years (viewers largely didn't give two toots about THAT show's changes other than being mildly happy but a bit confused that an older, greyer, quieter, bigger Richard was back) and OJ's ratings were the proverbial straw on the camel's back. 

Otherwise, traditional TV is largely a habit-based industry and has been for years. Viewers were absolutely not going to be expecting to see Price is Right on at 4/5/6/7 PM (or 1:05AM) on [insert NBC/FOX affiliate here], THEN when they get there it's "that guy from Young and the Restless" and different models and announcer and a different set and different music and half the games are played differently and - viewers who weren't watching Price is Right already weren't going to see THAT and go "this, I like this" in calendar year 1994 (at the zenith of the newsmagazine and talk booms), while viewers who WERE already watching Price is Right? "Where's Bob?" "Why does the set look like THAT?" (I LIKE the set, but it's a departure). "They're bidding on old commercials? What? I'll just watch Bob tomorrow" *click*.

Offline imhomerjay

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Re: Doug Davidson version
« Reply #20 on: June 12, 2024, 11:11:12 AM »
Hey, I watched regularly in daytime and was a huge fan of the 94 version. 😉If I could have had it daily instead of random weekend times, I’d have been there, not waiting for Bob the next day.