Poll

Which of these game show production companies, besides G-T, is the best?

Merv Griffin Productions (Wheel, Jeopardy!, Crosswords)
14 (60.9%)
Barry & Enright Productions (TTD, TJW, Bullseye, Twenty One)
2 (8.7%)
Merrill Heater-Bob Quigley Productions (Hollywood Squares, Gambit, High Rollers, Battlestars)
0 (0%)
Steven Hatos-Monty Hall Productions (LMAD, Split Second, 3 For The Money)
0 (0%)
Stone Stanley Productions (Shop 'Til You Drop, Legends of the Hidden Temple)
1 (4.3%)
Chuck Barris Productions (The Newlywed Game, The Dating Game, The Gong Show, Treasure Hunt)
0 (0%)
Reg Grundy Productions (SOTC, Scrabble, Time Machine)
2 (8.7%)
Bob Stewart Productions (Pyramid, Double Talk, Jackpot, Three on a Match)
1 (4.3%)
Jay Wolpert Productions (Whew!, Rodeo Drive, Blackout, include Nick Double Dare although by Viacom)
1 (4.3%)
Other
2 (8.7%)

Total Members Voted: 23

Author Topic: After G-T Productions, what's your favorite game show production company?  (Read 506 times)

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Offline pannoni1

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It's pretty widely understood that Mark Goodson-Bill Todman productions produced the greatest share for the game show genre to the point that one media source described it as the "GM" of the genre, with quite a variety of shows from quizzers to audience participation to panel to even the reality-leaning "That's My Line". But there are quite another of other teams that could easily argue for the #2 spot. Many of them have their own distinctive style to them (Trilons and word games for Bob Stewart, relationships and talent for Chuck Barris, "defeat the monster" in the bonus rounds for B-E). Please share your thoughts regarding your decisions and include factors ranging from quality, quantity, variety, and company stability.
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Offline vnisanian2001

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Bob Stewart Productions for me.

Offline gamesurf

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9) Stone Stanley Productions (Shop 'Til You Drop, Legends of the Hidden Temple)
Cheesy, but they knew exactly what they wanted to be. Fun, cheap, slightly over-the-top programming. They're not out to change the world or redefine the meaning of the words "game show". They just want to entertain you for a half hour. Everybody involved usually looks like they're having fun. Also, they did the Mole US, which doesn't fit on this list but is one heck of an honorable mention.


8 ) Jay Wolpert Productions (Whew!, Rodeo Drive, Blackout)
The mad scientist of the game show world, Jay Wolpert never met a complicated game show format he didn't like. His shows are a little too clever. Whew! takes some getting used to, but once you understand it, it scratches an itch that you didn't know existed. There's nothing like it. I'm glad somebody like him exists.


7) Barry & Enright Productions (TTD, TJW, Bullseye, Twenty One)
These guys have one show. They just dress it up with a different gimmick every time. They pick good gimmicks, the Q&A is usually solid, and the shows are usually watchable, but the lack of diversity prevents them from going any higher on this list. Also, Dan Enright nearly killed the genre in the 50's.


6) Steven Hatos-Monty Hall Productions (LMAD, Split Second, 3 For The Money)
LMAD is a very tricky format that falls apart if it's not produced just the right way. The fact that they pulled it off is nothing short of amazing. Their position on this list comes from the strength of that one show alone. I probably should reevaluate Split Second sometime.


5) Chuck Barris Productions (The Newlywed Game, The Dating Game, The Gong Show, Treasure Hunt)
A huge ball of cheese, but you can't look away. The Newlywed Game is still being played at parties everywhere. His shows aren't usually my cup of tea, and I can only enjoy these shows in small doses, but nobody can say that Chuckie Baby wasn't daring or influential, or was afraid to push the boundaries of what a "game show" was.  Was Chuck a harmless eccentric provocateur, or a CIA agent sent to destabilize the good taste of the public? Well, the skits on Treasure Hunt are fun to watch anyways.

Sidenote: Apparently there's an upcoming remake of Confessions of a Dangerous Mind with Justin Timberlake attached to star.


4) Reg Grundy Productions (SOTC, Scrabble)
I like SOTC very, very much. Besides Price and Jeopardy, it just might be my favorite game show ever. Scrabble is certainly no slouch either. Both shows had their production hiccups, and Reg's spotty record in the originality department prevents him from ranking higher, but once I turn on a rerun of SOTC I very rarely turn it off without seeing it to the end.


3) Merrill Heatter-Bob Quigley Productions (Hollywood Squares, Gambit, High Rollers, Battlestars)
Heatter-Quigley are perhaps closer in spirit to Goodson-Todman than any other production team on this list. These guys made some real gems. Outside of Hollywood Squares, they are mostly minor gems, but I appreciate the creativity and ingenuity in those formats. Hollywood Squares is not as easy or effortless to make as it looks, as Goodson himself would later find out.


2) Bob Stewart Productions (Pyramid, Chain Reaction, Jackpot)
Pyramid is in the running for the single best-produced game show on this list. Pyramid does tower over the rest of the studio's body of work though--had Bob been able to reproduce anything like it with his own studio, this pick would be number one easily. But I also love the simpler DIY "let's put on a show" aesthetic Stewart-produced shows had. The cheap-n-quick production style may have played a part in his other creations being unable to rise to that same level, but can't feel too bad for the man who created Password, TPiR, and To Tell the Truth.


1) Merv Griffin Productions (Wheel, Jeopardy)
"Merv's only two hits were Wheel and Jeopardy!". And when those are your only two hits, that's all you need. Stop anyone on the street and ask them to name any five game shows, and dollars to donuts both Wheel and Jeopardy will be among those listed. Merv built a great, enduring quizzer in the 60's; turned shopping-meets-hangman into a smash in the late 70's and 80's, and figured out how to keep both of them relevant & hooking audiences ever since.
« Last Edit: May 04, 2021, 03:53:31 PM by gamesurf »
Quote from: Bill Todman
"The sign of a good game, is when you don't have to explain it every day. The key is not simplicity, but apparent simplicity. Password looks like any idiot could have made it up, but we have 14 of our people working on that show. There is a great complexity behind the screen. It requires great work to keep it simple."

Offline SeaBreeze341

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It went from Barry / Enright to Merv Griffin for me.  In other words it's almost a tie but the edge went to the latter based on longevity, past-time, and "interactive trivia".  TTD & TJW were worth viewing, especially in the late 70s, and early to mid 80s.  Pretty much two shows that turned a hobby into a gameshow.  As time (decades) have passed I'd probably rank them at or near the same place gamesurf did.

Reg Grundy Productions produce a couple of shows (SOTC & Scrabble), which, while they didn't last too long, had a nice run.  Scrabble's success of turning a family activity into a gameshow was good enough to warrant an every-so-often binge watch. Even though Monopoly didn't make it, Scrabble was rather neat that I was interested to see how another popular boardgame to GS would turn out.  There was optimism given the show's creator.

Bob Stewart had several hits.  Chain Reaction is rather lovely but Pyramid, IMO, had the chance at becoming or being par (or better) than Jeopardy in terms of all-around competitive for cash and compensation.  In time, nearly half a century later, its run wasn't as extreme as, say Family Feud & TPIR (& obviously WOF and Jeopardy).  Despite the show lasting most of the first 15 years of its existence (and some revivals), it was a nice test on everyday things, from entertainment to stuff you might have learned in school
"Times change; people change" -- Casey Affleck

Offline Alfonzo

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I'd like to add another production company that often gets lost in the shuffle because a lot of his games got wiped: Ralph Andrews. His catalog: You Don't Say, I'll Bet/It's Your Bet, Liars Club, It Takes Two, Celebrity Sweepstakes,  50 Grand Slam, Lingo, and Yahtzee.

Including him, my favorites are Barry/Enright, Merv Griffin, Bob Stewart and Heatter/Quigley.
« Last Edit: May 05, 2021, 12:37:11 PM by Alfonzo »
"Audience, if you're scared buy a dog!"

Bryan, the Punchboard player who gave up $5,000 for a chance at $10,000 and won

Online pricefan18

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I'd like to add another production company that often gets lost in the shuffle because a lot of his games got wiped: Ralph Andrews. His catalog: You Don't Say, I'll Bet/It's Your Bet, Liar's Club, It Takes Two, Celebrity Sweepstakes,  50 Grand Slam, Lingo, and Yahtzee.

Including him, my favorites are Barry/Enright, Merv Griffin, Bob Stewart and Heatter/Quigley.

You could also put Al Howard's company here....as he was the brains behind Supermarket Sweep going all the back to the original incarnation of it in the 1960's (and actually looking at his bio, the original Sale of the Century then as well). Thought of that going over this list too.
« Last Edit: May 04, 2021, 07:20:13 PM by pricefan18 »

Offline Chief-O

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While he wouldn't be my pick, Ralph Edwards is also worthy of inclusion here. He helmed the most successful--and best--incarnation of "Name That Tune", he produced the sorely underrated "Cross-Wits", and his decision to step down from his flagship show opened the door for a certain someone everyone on this very forum is familiar with.

Offline Alfonzo

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While he wouldn't be my pick, Ralph Edwards is also worthy of inclusion here. He helmed the most successful--and best--incarnation of "Name That Tune", he produced the sorely underrated "Cross-Wits", and his decision to step down from his flagship show opened the door for a certain someone everyone on this very forum is familiar with.

Ralph Edwards also produced the one season oddity "So You Think You Got Troubles?!" in 1982. The host was Jay Johnson and his ventriloquist dummy, Bob. The announcer was some guy Jay and all of us here would become very familiar with, Rod Roddy.

And yes, the original "Cross-Wits" from the 1970s is VERY underrated!
« Last Edit: May 05, 2021, 05:45:24 AM by Alfonzo »
"Audience, if you're scared buy a dog!"

Bryan, the Punchboard player who gave up $5,000 for a chance at $10,000 and won