Studio 33 - Price is Right Discussion > The TALK Is Right

CBS Affiliates That Have Dropped Price and For What?

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ThatDonGuy:

--- Quote from: pannoni1 on December 01, 2021, 08:06:42 AM ---Other shows known to pre-empt Price included a portion of channel 9's Morning Break, sitcom reruns of All In The Family, One Day At A Time, The Jeffersons, and Alice. Trebek Double Dare and Kennedy Beat the Clock did clear though.

--- End quote ---

"Kennedy" Beat the Clock? Do you mean Monty Hall?

The Big Wheel:
Do networks require their affiliates to carry a good portion, if not most, of their programming? Aside from breaking news and special programs, what portion of a network's schedule can an affiliate regularly bump for their own local shows?

pannoni1:
For O&O's, it's 100% of their programming, unless if a special waiver is granted, although that's only in unusual circumstances if it isn't for a special report. For others, its free to what they ever want, except for the morning news shows by the networks. Some affiliates may be owned by a company that produces their own programming for them, so for WLWT in Cincinnati which was owned by AVCO and later Multimedia, they were required to show Donahue, Sally Jessy Raphael, and later Jerry Springer (which were produced by those companies), which definitely cut into some NBC daytime programming, especially from 1988 onwards when Sally was expanded to an hour. In fact, in the 1988-89 season, WLWT only cleared Win, Loser or Dra and Classic Concentration and didn't air daytime Wheel and Scrabble despite being among the most popular game shows at the time, in addition to the frequently pre-empted Sale of the Century and Super Password, but did clear the short-lived Don Blu version of the Gong Show and Sweethearts for syndication, and they aired at a reasonable after-school hour. Hour Magazine in the '80s for the Group W stations was another. But generally speaking, the shows that get satisfactory ratings in most instances get kept by the network, though in instances like those talk shows, the higher ratings in certain markets compared to comparable game shows (and a few soaps) led affiliates to prioritize those shows in expense of network shows. Once this started to become widespread as the years went on, the networks saw that most of the game shows weren't lucrative for their networks and either gave time back to their affiliates, produce their own talk show (Home or The View in ABC's case), or expanded the morning news.

Axl:

--- Quote from: pannoni1 on December 04, 2021, 08:14:17 AM ---For O&O's, it's 100% of their programming, unless if a special waiver is granted, although that's only in unusual circumstances if it isn't for a special report. For others, its free to what they ever want, except for the morning news shows by the networks.
--- End quote ---

I'm not sure where you got that impression. The CBS morning show was constantly under threat of preŽmption for many years because its ratings were so awful.

The amount of programming that a station intends to preŽmpt is typically a topic around contract renewal time and is subject to negotiation. It's one of the factors that has led to any number of affiliation swaps over the years.

Back in the days when networks paid local stations to air their programs, they would obviously withhold compensation for any shows that a station did not air. Networks don't do that anyone, so they have one less tool to discourage preŽmptions.

TPIRZippy:

--- Quote from: Axl on December 06, 2021, 05:05:13 AM ---I'm not sure where you got that impression. The CBS morning show was constantly under threat of preŽmption for many years because its ratings were so awful.

The amount of programming that a station intends to preŽmpt is typically a topic around contract renewal time and is subject to negotiation. It's one of the factors that has led to any number of affiliation swaps over the years.

Back in the days when networks paid local stations to air their programs, they would obviously withhold compensation for any shows that a station did not air. Networks don't do that anyone, so they have one less tool to discourage preŽmptions.

--- End quote ---

Indeed, WHDH in Boston didn't show CBS This Morning in 1994 because the ratings for it were so bad; they did a longer local morning newscast which did better.  (An independent station picked up This Morning then.)  In January 1995, when WBZ became CBS and WHDH became NBC, the Today show cleared on WHDH.  In 2010, during the Jay Leno Show debacle at 10pm, WHDH was sick of their 11pm newscasts getting killed thanks to the terrible ratings of the lead-in every night and said that they would not carry the Jay Leno Show at 10pm anymore.  NBC told WHDH that if they did that, they would lose their affiliation immediately.  WHDH relented and showed it, absorbing the hit on their newscasts, until the show was cancelled anyway.  When WBZ and WHDH swapped, it was announced that WBZ would clear the entire CBS network schedule barring local news special reports.   Before Group W/Westinghouse bought CBS, WBZ was known to preempt lower-rated NBC fare, especially in the 80s.  (Same at WCVB, who in 1972 had promised to produce the most local shows in the country, which ABC was more willing to tolerate than the others.)
WHDH fighting with NBC probably didn't help them a couple years ago when NBC ditched them against WHDH's protests, but they are still doing well as a news-intensive independent just like sister station WSVN which Ed Ansin also had a fight with NBC at.

Price has always managed to clear in Boston on channel 7 or 4, but some game shows in the 80s indeed didn't always clear on WBZ when it was NBC.

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