Author Topic: Giving The Show Another Chance  (Read 2032 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline imhomerjay

  • Double Showcase Winner
  • ******
  • Posts: 2057
Re: Giving The Show Another Chance
« Reply #15 on: May 16, 2024, 08:53:43 AM »
He owns a minority stake in the Seattle Sounders.
And he does some satellite radio stuff on the side. He is in no need of launching a new sitcom or touring with a heavy schedule. If he wants to do some less visible things that interest him, great. More power to him for following his path.

Offline thatvhstapeguy

  • 4/22/2024
  • TPiR Alumnus
  • *
  • Posts: 142
  • First person to ever see $2.75 in Pocket
Re: Giving The Show Another Chance
« Reply #16 on: May 16, 2024, 11:58:32 AM »
I was waiting for him to pause and tease before pushing the buttons on the reveal, but he would be back talking with the contestant and then just go up and hit them at all speed without saying anything at that moment.

Drew doesn't always do this; when I played Pocket he got me real good with a fake on the (winning) last card... and half of it didn't make it out of the edit bay.
I didn't get called down, but the guy next to me did
Oops, that isn't true anymore

Offline COINBOYNYC

  • Double Showcase Winner
  • ******
  • Posts: 1032
Re: Giving The Show Another Chance
« Reply #17 on: May 22, 2024, 08:06:41 PM »
The GP plugs were nothing but "a (size) of (thing)".  Not one product was sponsored, and if they're not going to do the unsponsored plugs that at least mention some facts about the product aside from the amount in the packaging, then why bother?

I strongly agree.

When Rich Fields was announcer, the generic plugs were more... is "narrative" the word I'm looking for here?   I didn't even realize at first that brand names weren't even mentioned.

Some examples of what I like to call "Rich Fields' Guidance For Living:"

"Nothing complements a meal better than a delicious bowl of hearty soup."
"Feed your cat the foods that will keep him healthy and happy."
"Enjoy the nutrition of vegetables at every meal."
"Taking a vitamin supplement can be part of a healthy regimen; use as directed."
"Bring out the kid in you by enjoying a glass of tasty flavored milk."
"Start every day right by eating a healthy breakfast."
"Chocolate chip cookies can put a smile on your face.  A perfect snack anytime."

I'm sure everyone would agree that "Quench your thirst with the refreshing taste of bottled water, a good choice for a healthy lifestyle" sounds more engaging than "A 16.9 ounce bottle of water."
Fun fact: Evelyn Wong, the 5th person to be called on the first show (9/4/72), was actually the very first contestant to directly be called to come on down!  The original first four (Sandy Flornor, Paul Levine, Connie Donnel, Myra Carter) were individually told to stand up, and then, as a group, were invited to come on down.

Offline illustriousrocket

  • In the Audience
  • **
  • Posts: 31
Re: Giving The Show Another Chance
« Reply #18 on: May 22, 2024, 09:02:07 PM »
<snip for length>

You're right. I think those lines work because they still sound close enough to actual item copy, just with the brands removed. Like with the soup one, if you added "Campbell's" to that sentence, it would be a full, clear description. But if you added the brand name to a generic quick description of the item - say, "a 16.9 ounce bottle of Poland Spring water" - it still sounds empty. It functions, but isn't all that interesting.

The runtime cut is the biggest obstacle the show faces right now.

Offline Nick

  • Double Showcase Winner
  • ******
  • Posts: 3796
Re: Giving The Show Another Chance
« Reply #19 on: May 22, 2024, 09:06:05 PM »
I agree that the show should still be done live to tape. I don't understand why it's not done like that anymore

Ultimately, Drew seemed to have a difficult time wrapping his head around the idea that as the MC, it's his job to keep the show moving.  He was more than content to just stand there and let a contestant take all the time he wanted to make a decision.  Couple that with the desire of showrunners after Roger wanting to "manufacture" the show, for lack of a better term, the way they seemed to think it should be.

The best example was one I witnessed in the studio.  A home gym was revealed as the first prize in the Showcase, and the contestant reacted in a natural fashion one might expect to someone to react in such a situation (smiling but not too excited).  They didn't like that take, so they did a pickup, where the contestant was told to act more excited.  She gave a much bigger display the second time around, and then they stopped to shoot the reveal again because, as the stage manager put it, "You gave me a ten.  I need a six", in terms of a scale of excitement.  Third time around was the charm, I guess.

But what was wrong with the contestant's initial reaction?  Nothing.  You can't expect contestants to react a certain way to things.  The contestants were chosen (or at least should be chosen) based upon their personalities.  This also goes back to Drew in that (at least when I last watched the show regularly.  Perhaps he's gotten much better at this, but it still doesn't change my point that this is part of why the show lost me as a viewer) his only schtick with every contestant coming up on stage was to ask, "Where 'ya from?" and "Whaddya' do back in (hometown)?".  When he's doing nothing to bring out the personality of the contestants by actually interacting with them, the show decided the fix for this was to start to have them behave in certain ways that are supposed to demonstrate excitement (e.g., "Go see your car!" every time a car is won).

This is probably one of the best examples I've seen of Barker interacting with a contestant and then using what the contestant tells us about himself to bring out the best in him and make for engaging television.

- Barker has a meaningful discussion with the on-stage contestant and finds out he has the not-so-usual career of singer.
- The contestant is expected to make his own decisions in the pricing game.
- Barker chides contestant for turning to the audience instead of making up his own mind saying, "Here's a guy who does the songs of a quartet all by himself... If you do all that singing by yourself, you can handle this", and the contestant gives a witty retort of, "Singing is not this".
- Barker then encourages him to sing his answers, which he does, and shows he really does have a great singing voice.

I wanted nothing more at that point than to see that contestant win because Barker made a star out of him and brought out the best of his personality.  WGMC indeed.

What's wrong with George giving his mom an at the most 10 second shoutout once a day (sometimes twice a day if there's a primetime show the same night) for a decade?

If it didn't take ten seconds, that would be the first part of a fix.  It's such a gross waste of time when the show simply isn't given enough time to work with these days.

I get the impression he doesnt want to do any of that and just wants to enjoy life. Dude is in his mid-60s. He occasionally does comedy shows (he was here in Springfield a few years ago for one night only)

Fair enough now, though fifteen years ago, it would have seemed like the thing he should have done to leverage his exposure and position as host of Price.  Back then, he certainly seemed like he would have taken another gig.

When Rich Fields was announcer, the generic plugs were more... is "narrative" the word I'm looking for here?... I'm sure everyone would agree that "Quench your thirst with the refreshing taste of bottled water, a good choice for a healthy lifestyle" sounds more engaging than "A 16.9 ounce bottle of water."

It does, but I think there's a happy medium still to be struck.  I was not a fan of the "guidance for living" style of the generic plugs, though the austere "(size) of (thing)" plugs are not the fix.  Every product has a blurb or two on it about what it is and why it's better than the others so should buy it.  Take those blurbs, and you've got yourself a plug that sounds somewhat legitimate.
Roger Dobkowitz's Seven Commandments of The Price Is Right:
1. Tape and edit the show as if it were live.
2. Never tell the contestant what to do.
3. Size matters. (The bigger the prize, the better the prize and the bigger the reaction.)
4. All prizes are good.
5. Never do anything on the show that would embarrass a parent with a kid watching.
6. Never put on a prize that would make the show look cheap.
7. Its the game, stupid! (Its about the game.)

- Roger Dobkowitz on Stu's Show September 23, 2009.

Offline tpirfansince1972

  • In Contestant's Row
  • ***
  • Posts: 187
Re: Giving The Show Another Chance
« Reply #20 on: May 25, 2024, 10:08:31 AM »
Quite honestly, to me, I think it's MORE helpful to hear about the quantities or weights of products rather than a "commercial" for the product itself.

"This hearty 16.9 ounce can of Chunky soup is a fast and tasty way to have a full meal in a can, from Campbell's!"

Something like that would work for me, but again it seems fee plugs are very few and far between anymore.

Offline Nick

  • Double Showcase Winner
  • ******
  • Posts: 3796
Re: Giving The Show Another Chance
« Reply #21 on: May 25, 2024, 10:18:35 AM »
Quite honestly, to me, I think it's MORE helpful to hear about the quantities or weights of products rather than a "commercial" for the product itself.

The plugs are not about helpfulness.  They're supposed to be commercials because the show should be getting paid to feature said product.

Plus, your powers of observation are supposed to be at work.  The plug for the single pack and the multi-pack of Dentyne gum may be the same, but, as the contestant, you should be looking to see the volume of the product to make your pricing decisions.
Roger Dobkowitz's Seven Commandments of The Price Is Right:
1. Tape and edit the show as if it were live.
2. Never tell the contestant what to do.
3. Size matters. (The bigger the prize, the better the prize and the bigger the reaction.)
4. All prizes are good.
5. Never do anything on the show that would embarrass a parent with a kid watching.
6. Never put on a prize that would make the show look cheap.
7. Its the game, stupid! (Its about the game.)

- Roger Dobkowitz on Stu's Show September 23, 2009.

Offline therealcu2010

  • Director
  • **********
  • Posts: 5656
  • Acknowledge Me!
    • Buy a Vowel Boards, A Wheel of Fortune Community
Re: Giving The Show Another Chance
« Reply #22 on: May 25, 2024, 10:20:36 AM »
The plugs are not about helpfulness.  They're supposed to be commercials because the show should be getting paid to feature said product.

They're not being paid, though, so they're not going to give them free advertising...and with the continued time crunch the show is on, trimming the length of grocery product plugs is a much better time saver than cutting into gameplay...especially when the groceries are just a tool used to play the game.
"Nobody cares about the guest stars." - Roger Dobkowitz

"Change isn't always good. Sometimes changing things is a terrible mistake." - Bob Barker

People are tired of the f**kery and drama, but if we'd actually talk to each other sometimes instead of a whole bunch of private conversations with other people, it'd go a long way to perhaps fixing the problems most seem to see in the site.

Offline Nick

  • Double Showcase Winner
  • ******
  • Posts: 3796
Re: Giving The Show Another Chance
« Reply #23 on: May 25, 2024, 10:24:09 AM »
They're not being paid, though, so they're not going to give them free advertising

Hence why I said "should be".  I'd really like to know how hard they have tried in the last decade to get sponsors because I can't understand how they have literally none for GPs and SPs now.


with the continued time crunch the show is on, trimming the length of grocery product plugs is a much better time saver than cutting into gameplay...especially when the groceries are just a tool used to play the game.

This is treating the symptom and not the problem.  At what point can the show go to the network and say, "Can we please have two minutes back?  It's too tough to do a quality show with so little time with which to work"?
Roger Dobkowitz's Seven Commandments of The Price Is Right:
1. Tape and edit the show as if it were live.
2. Never tell the contestant what to do.
3. Size matters. (The bigger the prize, the better the prize and the bigger the reaction.)
4. All prizes are good.
5. Never do anything on the show that would embarrass a parent with a kid watching.
6. Never put on a prize that would make the show look cheap.
7. Its the game, stupid! (Its about the game.)

- Roger Dobkowitz on Stu's Show September 23, 2009.

Offline JayC

  • Double Showcase Winner
  • ******
  • Posts: 5946
Re: Giving The Show Another Chance
« Reply #24 on: May 25, 2024, 11:27:54 AM »
Hence why I said "should be".  I'd really like to know how hard they have tried in the last decade to get sponsors because I can't understand how they have literally none for GPs and SPs now.
Is it the show not trying, or manufacturers not seeking to have products used on the show? There's a lot more ways to advertise products besides on TV than there used to be back when much more of the products and prizes on the show were sponsored.